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9

Preparation As the wood dries, it shrinks. You'll likely get big splits and cracks. The rule of thumb for a board (vs. a round) is a year of drying per inch of thickness. Wood dries faster through the end grain but also tends to develop splits and cracks as a result because of the uneven shrinkage (but has less tendency to warp in that orientation). You ...


7

You could cut up an old bike tire. Cut off the sides, and you have a nice strip of actual tire tread. There are lots of different sizes of bike wheel, so you can customize the depth of the tread by choosing between road tire (skinny tire, shallow tread), off-road (much wider tire and deeper, bumpier tread), hybrids (a cross between road and off-road) and ...


6

While I've voted for the answer suggesting bike tyres, here are some alternatives: There are vinyl products that can be painted on (or dipped, but painting is better in this case). A couple of coats of black Plasti-dip, the brand I have here, would work nicely. Cylindrical pieces of black latex of the right sort of size are available - drysuit replacement ...


5

I think it's hard to judge the real difference between the paintings your nephew made and the example of the goal he has in mind: the first are taken in what seems a yellowish light, while the second is colour corrected (at least, it seems to have a proper white balance set) and taken in bright light. Assuming both the eyes of the giraffe and the fur on the ...


4

Let me start with a disclaimer. If it was my box, I wouldn't try to restore it. There's a good chance of turning it into a mess. Right now, it shows the character of age. Trying to restore it could leave you with something very unattractive. The wood seems bare, but if it had any kind of sealer (possibly including the stain), you will end up with a ...


4

Technically this is not an answer, because I don't know how to make colors "glow" after the painting is finished. My best bet is to try a glossy varnish. The main reason why the paintings don't glow is that they don't reflect enough light. Two main causes for that come to my mind: The wood beneath the paints absorbs light. He should prime the wood ...


3

Thought it would be useful to show what I did and the results. So, in the end I: Cleaned the metal corrosion off using vinegar. Initially with a cotton bud but then I switched to gently rubbing using a scouring pad. I checked the vinegar didn't affect the wood/stain first on a small patch underneath first. Oiled the box with mineral oil. I was pretty ...


3

Cut into rounds that big it will crack. You either need to embrace the cracking or dry even more slowly in a much thicker piece, only cutting later. This is a long term project. Endgrain should be sealed during the seasoning process. This has been covered in some depth at woodworking.se, which helped me on a much smaller project. The logo of course would ...


2

As an possibly less expensive solution sandblasting the logo into the wood could work as well. A resist stencil from your logo would be made to mask out the raised areas, like the type and fawn drawing, then the background would be sandblasted out. It would be easy to then (spray) paint the whole sign the background color, and then with a roller or some ...


2

Silicone works well as a mold material because virtually nothing adheres to silicone other than silicone. CA glue may not be a good choice, as it certainly will not adhere, but also may damage the surface of the mold. Your best option is to attach the wood to an outside jig or bracket of some sort, which has reference points to the mold that are not adhesive ...


1

You used the term "glow", but as others have pointed out, what you're referring to is making the colors pop; making them more vivid and with more depth ("glowing" requires that they emit their own light, which can be done but that's not what you're looking for here). Even if your cousin did make the colors literally glow in the second ...


1

Get a set of magnets (I think 4 but more may be needed) and drill holes in the wood on the side it sits against the mold and insert (glue in) the magnets. When you get ready to poor your concrete you place your wood and add the magnets on the outside of the mold, which should keep your wood in place. The bigger the piece of wood, the more magnets you need ...


1

I would say you are limited to using oil based paints to do this. You cannot paint acrylics over oils as the paint will later peel off or flake away. My suggestion is to buy a small inexpensive set of oil paint tubes. You can can buy an art set for as little as $20AUD. After the paint has thoroughly dried, give it 2 or 3 coats of an outdoor varnish to seal ...


1

It sounds like the hard part of this process will be translating the logo onto the tree trunk / log. Drying As many have said, this is largely a process of patience. If your aesthetics can stomach it, you can affix a metal strap around the top and bottom of the section of the tree trunk, in order to minimize splitting. This is akin to how a barrel has ...


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