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13

When I took jewelry making classes, we used the saw method mentioned in Kellerra's answer section "the slow way". You start by wrapping your desired wire around something round like a dowel to make a "spring" of circles and then you cut them apart with a saw. The best setup I found was to have something... either a dowel or steel bar... with a notch cut ...


10

there are a few ways to make rings/loops on your own. If you're just starting out you might want to consider buying ready-made rings in the appropriate size and gauge in a project kit. You would be surprised at how many rings even a small project like a dice bag will require. Just to get this out of the way, (and from personal experience) if you're going to ...


9

The flat parts of the wire are achieved by using a curved face chasing hammer and a hammering block. The chasing hammer has a slightly convex surface that makes those nice smooth transitions from the flat part of the wire to the regular rounded part of the wire. If the hammer surface is too flat you'll see hammer marks on the wire. Visually check the hammer ...


9

What you are looking for is called spring steel or spring-tempered wire. Tempering is a process where the wire is hardened by heating which allows the resulting spring steel to return to its original shape, despite significant deflection or twisting. When you bend a spring wire, it will maintain a strong, circular loop without kinking anywhere along its ...


8

There are three grades of hardness in jewellery wire: Full-hard, which is tempered wire that is very stiff. It's rarely used, because it's just too stiff for most jewellery. Half-hard, which is hardened during manufacture but is not fully tempered and is not so hard. It's pliable by hand, but you need to use some force to do it and pliers are often easier. ...


7

You could also use bicycle brake-cable wire— it's very bendy, tough, and virtually impossible to permanently fold. If you know any bikers, they might have old brake cables you could get for free. You should join it with crimp sleeves.


6

As you're only working in thin aluminium, I suggest a gouge chisel. It will need sharpening fairly often (a diamond file is probably easiest) to go through easily but should do a good job. Use scrapwood clamped down securely as your anvil. I don't have a gouge, but I've tested a straight chisel successfully. My scrap aluminium is 3mm thick and a cut of ...


6

Most of the wire I see in the stores today is mostly copper or something bonded to copper and it's usually dead soft. Here are some tips and tricks I have learned over time: Hammering: A regular jewelry hammer will change the shape of the wire unless you use a jewelry hammer with a rubber or nylon head. It really only works on flat pieces and is kind of ...


6

The look of it strongly reminds me of christmas tree balls. They even work according to the same principle. Maybe you have some old christmas tree balls you don't like anymore or one that's broken. Pull the cap out and remove the wire from the rest of the cap.


5

Copper has a melting point of 1085°C/1984°F which is well above your expected temperatures. There should be no danger of losing structural integrity of the sculpture due to melting of the copper wire. According to the chart at hyperphysics, copper has an expansion coefficient of 17x10^-6 per degree C. This is 0.000017 or 0.0017 percent per degree C. Only ...


4

What materials you use depends on the design of the lamp shade you want to make – is it a hanging ceiling lamp, a desk lamp, etc. How sturdy the frame needs to be depends on what material it is supposed to support (paper, wood, glass, plastic, etc.) For example, if you are making a paper lamp shade, then the coat hanger wire should be fine (like in those ...


4

Polymer clay doesn't shrink like real clay, so you don't have to worry about cracks/breaking of the clay while being heated. Most types of metal melt at temperatures way higher than polymer baking temperature, so you don't have to worry about that either. I've made Fimo things with a core of aluminium foil, and no problems at all.


4

so maybe something like that? I just used 2 pieces of bent and shaped 18 gauged wire, hammered out to make the pieces sit more flat, and then used 2 thin pieces of beading wire to anchor the 2 pieces together


4

A needle may not be as stiff as you think. One reason a needle seems so stiff is that it's short. A needle of the same diameter and material that was a foot long would not seem stiff at all by comparison. This is just the mechanics of materials at play. The design problem is a trade-off between wire diameter and material strength. The stiffness of the wire ...


4

I think the best option are sheet metal cutting shears, either manually handled ones (like heavy duty scissors), or electrical ones (power tools), although the latter one seems a little overkill for these small strips. Here is a demonstration video of both. You can get quite clean cuts with the 'scissors' variant. A variant of these, referred to as 'tin ...


3

According to this post, the black and red coloured wires are insulated with plastic: 2 coils at 33 feet wire red plastic insulation 2 coils at 33 feet wire black plastic insulation Unless you find packages with the regular 'silver' coloured wire - which according to a review here might actually be hard - I suggest using different wires.


3

I suggest aluminum : moderately corrosion resistant, inexpensive, easy to bend and cut, easily available. Look for it at farm supply store as electric fence wire. It does come in a fairly long spool but I find other uses for it like holding chicken and roasts on a rotisserie and in the garden holding branches etc. Aluminum is not very strong but you would ...


3

You may wish to look for piano wire which is made of high carbon steel and is fairly stiff.


3

You don't necessarily need a specialist hammer, a small ball pein or cabinet makers pin hammer from a hardware store will do the job. However you may need to polish the face as any scratches or defects in it will transfer to the work. Foam backed abrasive pads are good for this as the naturally create a slightly convex face. You will also need something to ...


2

Get a dowel in the diameter you want, drill a hole in one end and put the wire in it, attach the other end to the chuck of a drill and press go! Make sure its operated slowly. Don't take the spring you made off the dowel at this point. Take a dremmel and just cut down the side. If you are making tonnes, you might want to make a jig to make this faster.


2

Well home electrical wire is already prewrapped and 14 gauge wire is 1.6mm in diameter. House wire has 3 single wires (4 if 3-way) running through the main housing, and it will have one bare wire and 2 (or 3) wires individually coated. Granted your colors are limited to black, white and red but you can get some very straight coated wires this way. Just ...


2

Some craft shops sell the hoops and the special lamp fittings 'hoop with fitting holder' in a wide range of sizes and shapes. I got them from a small independent craft shop where I live ( the Netherlands) but I am pretty sure you can buy them online now. To make fabric covered shades you either need the fitting ring, an extra hoop and sturdy (plastic?) ...


2

If you're using the rotary tool with a suitable engraving bit, you may find it easier to trace the state profiles by attaching the paper to the slate with an adhesive. Even a simple glue stick will wash off with water once the job is completed. By tracing around the shape, the lines you generate may be more consistently positioned by not being centered on ...


1

Just rebending the wire is likely to break it. Theoretically, it could be unsoldered and the earrings remade. From your link, it looks like they retail for $24. You would spend more than that for a jeweler to do the work. The question suggests that you aren't an experienced jewelry maker, yourself, so this wouldn't be something you likely could tackle and ...


1

"Can you" is a different question from "is that the best way". I think the answer is you can, but it probably isn't the best way. Embedding the clasp, then baking The metal in the clasp shouldn't interfere with the clay's hardening or properties. The clasps don't typically have a finish that would be damaged by the heat, and even cheap ...


1

If you are making an armature , a good hardware store will have several sizes of bare copper wire . Mostly larger diameters like 12 gauge up to 000 ( guessing 0.312")


1

Pure Aluminum melts at 660°C so a soldering iron won't be enough, I suggest you to use a Blow Torch that can reach a temperature of 1300°C, if you keep the wire vertical and melt it the end of the cable would result in a perfect round. Be careful, droplets are very hot, it's much worse than a classic soldering burn!


1

Other than using wire, you could create the design using precious metal clay such as silver metal clay and setting it in a kiln or you can use a blow torch and fire-proof mat. Fine silver metal clay results in objects containing 99.9% pure silver, which is suitable for enameling.


1

I'm sorry, but I have my doubts you could ever create this design with metal wires. I would have suggested using either epoxy resin or a similar glue or a slightly flexible power adhesive, but there are several problems: The overlap in the blue circle is very thin (fragile), but has to withstand high leverage forces because of the long structure attached ...


1

Hardened wire is difficult to "use in a perpendicular" way. It really isn't meant to bend, or twist. It is a flowing substance, like for bicycle cables! Guitar strings, you can just buy a set of new ones for a few dollars. To fuse the ends is relatively easy. If you have a Propane Torch, check to see if it is MAPP gas compatible. If you don't know, just ...


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