27

The answer is quite simple really: you can mix watercolours (and paints in general), whereas you can't easily mix coloured pencils. For example: If I have two different blues - a light and a dark - and I want a blue that's halfway in between, with watercolours I can just take roughly equal quantities of each, mix them together and use that. With pencils, I ...


23

Watercolor paper is, normally, quite a bit heavier and made from cotton. Basic watercolor paper, 140lb, is okay for practice and will tend to buckle unless stretched. The expensive 300lb paper is where professionals tend to land. In any case, the paint pools and absorbs differently than normal paper, and gives you options around blending, washes, etc. that ...


19

Watercolor is, by its very nature, a transparent medium and so it becomes really quite difficult to manage this. However, there are a couple of things you can do to help: Draw very lightly and then use a kneaded eraser to lift the lines that you have left. The remaining lines will be much more faint than had you just drawn as light as you can. Draw on ...


19

Something else that may help to explain the difference is that watercolor painters can be quite picky about which paints they choose for mixing. Each watercolor paint is made from 1 or more pigments, which are some sort of substance that is used to make the color. For example, the color winsor yellow deep contains one pigment: PY65. In contrast, cadmium ...


18

I think what you are looking for is called a masking fluid. It is sometimes also called liquid frisket. Masking fluid can be treated like paint which wherever it is applied will protect what is underneath. A feature of most masking fluids is that they are removable once dry. Some masking fluids are strongly hydrophobic (water repellent), and water will ...


14

Many people do this, it is common practice among watercolorists. Watercolor paints can be used in their wet form via a tube or they can be used as a dried over consistency. It has nothing to do with the paint being cheap or kiddie as another commenter said. It’s just preference to which consistency you prefer. I prefer to have the watercolor dried out as it ...


13

It sounds like your wife learned to paint with watercolor paints in pans, and/or learned from someone who only really knew of these types of paints: These are in a sense the ancestors of the kiddie watercolors you may have struggled with as a child, and thus you might think that they're lower quality than tube paints, but that's not actually the case: they'...


12

To prevent the paper buckling/cockling you pre-stretch it, That is you wet the paper and tape it down to a rigid board with gum strip. I generally use a wooden drawing board that I made in work shop practice 50 odd years ago. Note masking tape does not work as well as gum-strip for this as it does not adhere very well to wet paper. You paint onto the ...


9

There are a couple of things that will definitely work to help preserve displayed paintings: Paint quality. If you want the paint to remain vibrant over time, then you get what you pay for. Artist/professional grade paints are substantially more lightfast than student or children's paints. So, if you want it to stick around better, get the good paint. ...


9

When paper gets wet, it expands. Apply wet watercolour to only part of the paper, and only part of the paper will expand, causing the paper to buckle. If there are no constraints on the paper, the paper will dry buckled. (This effect will be less noticeable the thicker the paper is.) Before you paint You can purchase blocks of paper where every page is ...


8

Usually you can't, as the packaging generally doesn't show this information. What you can do, is test the watercolour out in the store, which is often possible (if no direct means are given, you can ask an employee), look up some reviews and see if they refer to the staining properties, or look up or into the brand's colour charts: Some brands or ranges ...


8

Normally, in watercolour painting, you don't get any "white" paint. The techniques for watercolour painting, as you stated, is to use the underlying paper to supply the "white" colour, and to supply for the brightness of a colour as you use coloured washes to allow the white to show through that layer's transparency. However, there is a thing called ...


7

The answer is to pre-stretch the paper before painting, and leave it stretched until dry. To pre-stretch, wet the paper evenly, then tack down the corners to a drawing board with some slight tension. Using water activated tape (paper tape) tape the edges of the paper to the board with 1/4" to 3/8"s overlap on the paper smoothing out the tension as you go....


6

Hard water will work fine. However, as with all impurities, the minerals it contains will have an impact on both the purity of the colours and the texture of the paint. Colour purity Hard water contains relatively high levels of calcium and magnesium, known for causing buildups of limescale: as the carbonates are deposited, they leave an insoluble off-...


5

It would be helpful to know the thickness/density of your paper. The specifics, grades, etc. are beyond your question. However, you can look at the cover of your pad or pack, refer to your supplier if you buy singly, or do some experimenting. For the sake of your question, I'll refer to the standard labeling of 90 lb, 140 lb and 300 lb. 90 being very thin (...


5

It's best to act quickly, and absorb the paint with either a cloth or (nearly) dry brush. You can remove most of the spilled paint that way. Then, depending on what's still visible, you might want to wet the edges of the stain, to soften the colour transition. You might also want to repaint a part of the existing painting, or if you're really creative, ...


5

7 tips for working with masking fluid, from Artists & Illustrators I use a great deal of water, sometimes pouring colour onto the paper from a small jar and then responding to its progress with further washes as it begins to dry. I normally apply masking fluid to protect small, relatively complex shapes. Masking fluid is often a difficult medium. ...


5

Gelatin used in paper is made from animal hide cooked down into a gelatin form, while starch is made from wheat and chalk. So for a cruelty-free/animal friendly option, people do prefer to use starch over gelatin for paper-making. Because starch kind of puts a layer/barrier on the paper, it helps with the watercolor not saturating the paper and absorbing ...


4

That really depends on the paper itself. Usually, sketch paper will be too thin for watercolors to come out in a satisfactory manner. That being said, it all depends on what your final outcome is. Where the piece will be displayed, and what effects you are trying to get.


4

There can be more textural/quality difference between two different pigments of the same brand and type of watercolor than there is between, say, a tube of ultramarine blue vs. a pan of ultramarine blue from the same manufacturer. The difference between the types of watercolors really comes down to technique: the way you use tube colors is quite different ...


4

You get these outlines when the pigment collects on the edges of the water you have laid down. This happens when you use a lot of water, causing the pigment to float around in the "puddle" and gravitate towards the edges as it dries (if you're interested in the physics, there's even a name for it: the coffee ring effect!). To avoid these outlines, you need ...


4

Yes, there is a way to flatten the paper after the fact if you did not pre-stretch it. After you've completed the painting and the paint has dried completely (it's really important that it must be absolutely dry), put the painting face-down on a clean dry table. Gradually moisten the back of the paper with a damp sponge to relax it. Ensure that you moisten ...


4

When it comes to watercolor, the one place I really recommend avoiding going student grade on is the paper. There are some really excellent student paints, but for paper, meh... On that front, the biggest names in paper are Arches and Fabriano, but what you're really looking for is 100% cotton rag at 140 lbs in any brand. Some are, really, better than ...


4

It's an aquarelle painting and from the looks of it either watercolors or inks (or both) were used. This technique uses lots of water, so you need really thick paper for it. Many hobby / craft / art shops sell special aquarelle paper. It's as thick as cardboard but white. Acrylic colors are not well suited for this kind of art because they dry too fast ...


3

Watercolor is especially susceptible to fading under light. This can be explained by the binder for watercolor and the way watercolor is used. The binder is usually a mixture that contains mostly gum arabic. Due to the usage of watercolor in thin layers the binder will not be able to coat the pigment properly leaving it exposed to light. Lightfastness should ...


3

I'm far from an expert, but here's what I've picked up: The most important technique for watercolor is to work light to dark. Unlike other types of paint, you can't just paint a lighter color over a dark patch. (You can lift pigment after, but it typically leaves slight discoloration, and you risk damaging the paper.) Instead, with watercolor you are ...


3

Speaking of appearance only, pan colors tend to be more washed, so think runny light watercolor. Tubes tend to be more opaque, especially in cheap "gouache" type that is more closely related to egg tempera and acrylics. For quality aquarelles the differences vanish and become more a question of preference, portability, lightness of touch, working methods, ...


3

There are special pencils to be used with water, the lines of which will dissolve in water. Watercolour pencils These are designed for use with watercolour techniques. The pencils can be used by themselves for sharp, bold lines. Strokes made by the pencil can also be saturated with water and spread with brushes.[70] (From this Wikipedia page about ...


3

I am going to assume by 'normal pencil' you mean you are using a number two/2B graphite pencil, so I'm sorry if that is not the case. It might help to instead use a harder pencil, like a 3H or 4H to draw your sketch in lightly. The lines on harder graphite pencils will be much fainter than a normal pencil, and as long as you are drawing gently should be ...


3

Some pigments used in inks are UV sensitive and disappear rather quickly when exposed to sunlight, others remain unaffected. Having in mind the colours you need, make some research about which pigments are used to make your desired colours and which of them are UV sensitive and which are not. Check what water-based products are available on the market and ...


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