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What system are you using? Airbrush or bottle spray? I have experienced a lot of frosting when applying varnish in humid environments. I have observed more frosting with spray bottles compared to airbrush (I dilute the varnish for airbrushing with Vallejo airbrush thinner). Only apply a very thin layer of varnish at a time. I have observed frosting when I ...


7

The only beeswax product by Michael Harding I was able to find is Beeswax paste, which has a "high oil content" as it is mixed with linseed stand oil, explaining the long drying time. This product is used to mix oil paints with, to increase the volume of the paint (e.g. for impasto's) and give it a matte sheen (similar to encaustic). For varnishes, you'd ...


4

Some pigments used in inks are UV sensitive and disappear rather quickly when exposed to sunlight, others remain unaffected. Having in mind the colours you need, make some research about which pigments are used to make your desired colours and which of them are UV sensitive and which are not. Check what water-based products are available on the market and ...


3

Sources of bubbles Mod Podge doesn't contain solvents that degas and create bubbles in the finish. If you are getting bubbles in the finish, it's either because of air bubbles that got mixed into the product, or air trapped during application. Getting rid of bubbles in the product As Allison C notes in a comment, the product gets a lot more shaking ...


3

I have crossed this situation where clients want to stain their banisters and paint the spindles. In such cases, we stain first, then tape off the banister and paint the spindles. Note: You can stain (light colors / not solid) over paint and it will adhere, giving it an antique look. Example photo below of stain over paint.


2

Honestly, you should be using glaze and not varnish. I get that you're just trying to protect a painting outside the mug, but even if you just wash it by hand, a varnish is likely going to break down much, much faster (especially with heating it) than a food safe glaze which can be applied to the whole mug creating a seal to protect everything and can often ...


2

i've been decorating some metal mailboxes which have been outdoors for 1.5 years and are still looking good. the process i started by removing old paint/lacquer that was about to fall off. i did this by mounting a wire wheel brush on my drill and brushing the mailbox. next, i cleaned the mailbox with white spirit followed by cleaning it in water and drying ...


1

A transparent protective layer would be ideal. I propose acryllic based coatings because they bond well with the painting and are soft enough to not chip away when bumped into. They are also elastic enough to not indent permanently, unless you have a go at them with a sharp object. Glossy acryllic varnish or Mod Podge are ideal. Instead of slapping a single, ...


1

You said that you will be painting the ground galvanized metal. If you use outdoor weatherproof paint, then you will be weatherproofing your material for the length of time indicated in the tin.


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With the first coat you should dissolve the crushed shellac flakes in denatured alcohol with a bit more shellac than usual, and stir in an emulsion of premixed marble dust, a touch of linseed oil and fresh egg yolk until you get the right consistency for painting. If it doesn’t dry fast enough for you, consider adding a few drops of saponifying ‘japan drier’...


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