15

There usually two different kinds of glue you commonly find. One will come off if you just soak the label under water over night. Doesn't have to be soapy. It helps to score the surface of the label with a cross hatching with a razor. Some labels are waterproof. You need the water to get through to the glue. The other kind of glue will come off with VM&...


10

No, the gray and black light-sensitive chemicals are embedded on the film media and won't simply wash off or "turn clear" in bleach. What you are trying to do is known as Draw-on-film animation, but I've also seen it referred to as cameraless animation, clear leader animation, marker animation, scratch film, and direct animation. I enjoyed trying ...


9

There are 2 kinds of glue used in bottles (as far as I'm aware): Water based glue; Oil based glue; To remove For water based Leave the bottle soaking overnight and scrub it next day. For oil based As oil is more expensive than water and soaking in oil would take up a lot of it, I just put oil in my hands and spread the oil on the label. Make sure the ...


6

There are lots of variations on neoprene. It can have different additives that affect characteristics like softness and surface appearance. Sometimes it is bonded to a fabric. There are variants that are very soft and a little tacky that will grip a surface for extreme non-slip. But as long as it's rubbery and soft enough to conform to the surface, it ...


5

That's an imaginative gift! The silk screen industry has been applying paint to fabric (umbrellas included) for some time. You might be able to by a small amount from a local shop. The inks (paints) used are reducible to some degree and may be your answer, as they are both flexible and impervious to water. Your timeline is problematic though, as it does ...


5

If you have particularly tough to remove labels, I have found Goo Gone to be very effective. Apply a bit to the label and let it sit for a couple of minutes. The label should come off really easily. Apply a little more to a paper towel and rub off the remaining adhesive left on the bottle. Then wash with hot water and soap. Goo Gone isn't very expensive and ...


5

Method for effortless removing labels and glue: Fill the bottle with boiling water and wait a few minutes. High temperature should weaken the adhesive, so the labels can be peeled in one piece. Use a kitchen funnel and baking glove to avoid hand burns. The adhesive will remain on the bottle. To wash it of use kitchen steel wool and ordinary vegetable ...


5

There are specialised chemical sprays, available reasonably cheaply, for doing exactly this: I've always used the Maplins one. It comes in an aerosol spray bottle and with a long thin tube to attach to the aerosol so as to direct the spray very precisely if required. I've found it fast and effective at removing labels from not only glass but also plastic ...


5

For labels not affected by the dishwasher I found that WD-40 removes most glues, and it has the advantage that it is easily absorbed by paper labels so just spraying it on the label and waiting is usually enough. Plastic labels are easier to peel off, a cloth or paper towel with WD-40 is usually enough to clean the remaining glue


4

Vinegar I had never found just water alone to work. I usually felt the need to remove most of the label before I recycled it. But now I have tried vinegar to much success. Here is the bottle I tested with before: Since it has not been mentioned, I thought I would go into a little detail by doing an experiment. After removing what I could of the label and ...


4

I homebrew, so on occasion end up removing labels from previously-enjoyed beer bottles before reusing for bottling my own beer. I've found that soaking overnight in a water solution of sodium percarbonate releases the majority of labels/glues. A couple of scoops (each about a cup) in a 5 gallon bucket of water seems to be a good dilution. Sodium ...


4

Ours is the low-tech, slow method. An overnight soak in soapy water (start it out hot) usually helps the glue release pretty nicely and softens the paper so that it's easy to scrape. If the first soak doesn't do the job a second shorter soak without the paper usually will. We use the plastic scraper (from our juicer) to scrape the surface of the bottles. ...


2

I've used the clear gesso with pigments to create underpainting. Clear gesso mixed with acrylics can achieve a faux watercolor paint effect. (I found an example YouTube video here.) I personally did this a little differently. I mixed the clear gesso with the paint in a little cup and added a few drops of water. I dipped my brush in the paint and painted over ...


2

Many labels that won't just soak off can be removed with a heat gun or hair dryer. Just heat up the label, starting with the corner you want to start at, and they'll usually peel off nicely. You don't have to get it REALLY hot, just really warm it up. If I don't have a heat gun or hair dryer handy, or don't want to bother with it, I'll hold it over the ...


1

You know, depending on the type of label, there's nothing wrong with letting the bottles sit in hot soapy water for awhile (half an hour or so), which will soften up the label and glue, and you should be able to remove most of it pretty easily after that. Whatever remains will come off with a soapy sponge and hot water. Simple, really.


1

As long as the underlying panel will not flex, yes, you can use normal acrylic paints, but a primer is required, and the recommended method is to fine sand the plexiglass to a slight roughness, then cover with primer. Acrylic polymer varnish is ideally suited to varnishing over acrylic paint, and I'm pretty certain you can use other varnishes.


1

Yes you can, dilute ordinary household bleach 1:10 with water, works a treat, I've done it loads of times.


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