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This approach will focus on using handheld glass cutters. Much of what is covered here applies to curves as well, however, I will only focus on cutting straight lines. This is one such cutter: Image from Amazon.com The most basic and versatile tool for cutting glass is the glass cutter. There are different styles and features, but all will have a cutting ...


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I might try a 'faux' joint... Copper tape of an appropriate width over the cracks, solder over the tape. If you do it on both sides it'll be impossible to tell that it's not an actual joint.


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Take it apart Desolder the near and far corners of the frame - easier said than done, but just patiently melt the solder and push it away with the tip of the soldering iron. Glue the broken glass back together Once half the frame is removed, the broken pieces will probably still adhere to the foil, but still be flexible to allow the insertion of your ...


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This is completely a guess on my part...but I know that when I was taking a jewelry design class in the early 1990s, my instructor had to eliminate the enameling section of the class because the "ingredients" and techniques had just been determined too toxic to teach, and she hadn't worked with the new resins enough to be comfortable teaching with them. ...


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I may not be completely understanding your question. It seems to me that backlighting, by its very nature, is going to change the vibrancy of the enamel color, and thereby change the color itself. But, assuming I am understanding your question correctly, what you are attempting to do is called "plique a jour" enameling. Basically, plique a jour enameling ...


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