11

Print on regular white paper. Adhere the print to the black paper with rubber cement or temporary adhesive. Do the cutting, and scoring if needed (light scoring can also be used to mark glue edges and similar feature lines). When you're ready to assemble, peel off the white paper.


8

Printer ink is very hard - if not impossible - to see on black paper, because the ink soaks into the paper. Laser printer toner creates a very thin layer of molten plastic on top of the paper, so you might be able to see a yellow line on the black paper if you print it with a laser printer. (Unless you have a specialized printer with white toner, "white&...


5

Generally you can print with white ink in many inkjet printers. However, there are some very important notes. Not all printers will work well when this is done. In many cases this is due to the manufacturing of the ink itself. Epson actually makes white ink for some select high-end printers. White will typically be a pigment-based ink rather than a dye-...


4

I'll go with a completely different idea. Use a laser cutter, or vinyl or paper cutter to do your work. You already have a PDF, so you should be able to open it in a variety of software to send it to one of these machines. I use a laser cutter to cut a lot of things, from acrylic sheets to leather and paper. It can leave very little residue when cutting ...


3

I think what is important in the nomenclature of the edition is the intention of the artist, meaning that potential inconsistencies have no bearing on the artistic intention. Irregularities that have a significant impact on different prints are usually eliminated during the print proof phase - if they're not, they become part of the artistic intention, after ...


3

As far as I'm aware (I'm not a professional artist) the artist should strive to make each print of a series as equal to all other prints as possible. However, if the artist intentionally introduces non-reproduceable variations in how the paper is printed or alters the print by hand, it can be considered a "Varied Edition", "Variable Edition&...


3

Stuff that works directly with a laser printer will have the kinds of problems described in Gwyn's answer. If you have access to an inkjet printer, you will be in business. There are clear, printable vinyl sheets that stick to a wall or window with static electricity. The media will melt in a laser printer, but they're coated to accept inkjet printing. ...


3

Depends on the type of paint on the walls and the type of adhesive on the decals. In general, with normal PVA the sticker is going to end up damaging the paint either by bonding tightly and peeling it from the wall when you remove the sticker, or reacting with the paint and discolouring it over time. Some types of high gloss enamels fare better, but in ...


3

You have another answer that is 90% there. You need a black ink cartridge, empty it (print if possible), then fill it with white ink. Most new printers read the codes on the cartridges so you need the black one so that your printer doesn't need 20 drivers and hours of troubleshooting. (I am being very generic here and this will work great for 95% of ...


3

You can either scan the boxes with a high DPI setting, or take photographs of them with a semi-professional camera. In both cases you'll end up with a high-definition digital reproduction. You might have to perform some post-processing in software like Photoshop to properly isolate (crop and adjust the perspective of) the cover, adjust the white balance and/...


2

Browse your local bookstore and have a look at the most popular formats for hardcover books, mass market and trade paperbacks before you decide (if you are looking to publish and sell your book). When it comes to copies for your own use, pick the format that is most comfortable to your eye / reading style (and your wallet, of course, some formats are more ...


2

Think backwards. (Or as my professor put it, "Back thinkwards.") It's very uncommon for anyone to "draw first on a computer program and reverse it;" that's an unnecessary extra step and one that, perhaps obviously, did not exist at the birth of printmaking, which has existed far longer than digital technology. While I typically wouldn't ...


1

Finally I find some information. In this YouTube video, the paper they're printing cover on is 28lb bond and then they're single-side laminating each cover with 1.2mil gloss lamination. "Thicker sheets are harder to fold and manipulate so a thinner sheet and lamination are ideal for these type of covers." The main hard cover they are using is a ...


1

Some solutions in addition to the existing answers (that could prove useful for users facing a similar problem): Not sure if this is viable, but this might be the easiest solution: you can invert the picture you want to print, and print everything but the marks on white paper. You'll possibly have to tweak the margins (depending on the size/scale of the PDF)...


1

There are a number options for printing onto fabric. The two easiest ones are to buy either printable fabric sheets or printable transfer sheets. The former is great for labels or fabric you want to sew or quilt onto something, while the other is mostly for transferring an image to already made items, e.g. T-shirts. You can buy both at many hobby, craft or ...


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