9

I might try two things, one handle the clay as little as required, the less you touch it the less heat it will absorb. And maybe try something like Wristband coolers. The link is to one brand, but the idea is that you can cool down your whole body with these. It is a band that wraps your wrist (where you have a lot blood vessels). I'll run my wrists ...


7

Based on this blog post about comparing the various brands of translucent polymer clay, it sounds like the translucent is only apparent when the clay is incredibly thin. The author prepares the clay by running it through a pasta machine. I compared every polymer clay brand’s translucent that I could find. I conditioned each clay, carefully avoiding the ...


5

Copper has a melting point of 1085°C/1984°F which is well above your expected temperatures. There should be no danger of losing structural integrity of the sculpture due to melting of the copper wire. According to the chart at hyperphysics, copper has an expansion coefficient of 17x10^-6 per degree C. This is 0.000017 or 0.0017 percent per degree C. Only ...


5

Maybe, but it's probably not a good idea. For one thing, the package says not to do it. The manufacturer isn't just saying that because they want you to buy a toaster oven -- putting it in the microwave will result in burning. Because microwaves don’t heat evenly, parts of the mass will begin to cure and harden while others remain soft. Microwave ovens ...


4

Much simpler if you do it before. You will always deal with some shrinkage with polymer clay, so just make sure that the hole is a bit larger than you will need it. If you are really worried, try a couple of samples and measure how much they will shrink. But it is fairly minimal, so unless you need an exact fit, it is nothing that major.


4

Polymer clay doesn't shrink like real clay, so you don't have to worry about cracks/breaking of the clay while being heated. Most types of metal melt at temperatures way higher than polymer baking temperature, so you don't have to worry about that either. I've made Fimo things with a core of aluminium foil, and no problems at all.


4

I am not an expert on this subject, by any means, but I can share the information that is available so that you can at least make a more informed decision yourself. Polymer clay, just like most other materials and chemicals, comes with an MSDS (Material Safety Data Sheet). This sheet lists all the potential hazards and risks when using the material. All the ...


3

The generally accepted practice, as I've read on numerous websites and through books, is to break up the dried up clay into small pieces, add a little mineral oil (or baby oil), and massage/work the oil in. (If you're not wearing gloves, this will 'stain' your hands but it will wash off with a little effort). After the smaller pieces are softened, merge them ...


2

Hi I have faced issues like this too...And I actually found a way to fix the issue. All I did was to cook the clay... Yeah you read it right, I literally cooked the clay. On heating the clay it gets back its softness, just make sure you don't use too much heat. I am not sure of the level of heat to use either. And don't add anything like oil or things ...


2

No, it requires baking to set. I have a polymer clay only "toaster oven". It was designed for just using that medium. Look at your local craft store, or online 😊


2

If you burn your clay your oven is too hot. So turn down the heat a bit. You can also put your creation into a box made from aluminium foil pans. This will protect it from direct heat. You can also bake the clay multiple times. So create the bigger pieces first, bake them, add the details and bake everything again. Another option is to bake everything ...


2

Manufacturers have started reacting to their customers requests and produce some clays that can be cured in a microwave. It must be written on the packaging and there must be an instruction of how to cure it in the microwave. The instructions I saw included: The clay object must have a minimum thickness of several millimeters. You cannot cure thin sheets ...


1

It seems to have to do with the process of sanding, adding sealers and layering the acrylic paint in a specific order. It is going to need more than 2-4 layers of sealer and acrylic paint to finish the ornament. In my process I added a white primer as a base, but could have added a sealer on the very first layer, and then added a primer. Numerous layers need ...


1

"Can you" is a different question from "is that the best way". I think the answer is you can, but it probably isn't the best way. Embedding the clasp, then baking The metal in the clasp shouldn't interfere with the clay's hardening or properties. The clasps don't typically have a finish that would be damaged by the heat, and even cheap ...


1

Premo is one of the stronger kinds, so you're making the right choice there. I have only recently started using premo mixed my older sculpey III and have found it can cure as low as 225, but you'll obviously have to bake longer.


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