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6

There are lots of links that describe toxic fumes from burning or laser-cutting acrylic. Apparently, the risk also applies to the molten plastic, as you would encounter with 3D printing or molding. According to Everything You Need To Know About Acrylic (PMMA): ...fumes from 3D printing with acrylic or from the molten material used during injection ...


5

That looks like lichen. On plastic, you can probably remove it with just soapy water and a bristle brush or nylon scrubbing pad (but don't use something abrasive enough to scratch up the plastic or it will provide more surface for the next round of it to adhere to). It may help to first spray the lichen with vinegar, full strength with a little added soap ...


5

Short answer: you are using the wrong technique. Long answer: The light travels from the LED strip in straight lines through the acryllic and emerges at the top of the acryllic plate. In order to illuminate the pattern, the light beams have to be deflected into your eyes. Engraving the surface does just that: it puts tiny scratches into the surface that ...


5

As your objective appears to be the requirement to present a product, you aren't asking for production methods. This suggests that a suitable method is to use 3D printing, specifically resin printing, to create the enclosure. 3D resin printing is nearly layer free (strong magnification required) and presents a smooth professional appearance. It can be ...


4

I suggest using sheets of clear PVC: It's non-adhesive, a lot more durable than the more common polypropylene sheets (like the perforated 'punched pockets'), but still supple. They mostly come in standard sizes, like in the image, pre-folded and stitched to accommodate certain book size standards (as an example, the page from which I sourced the image has ...


3

The word "iron" (referring to the material / substance) has two meanings: literally: the pure substance, found in Mendeleev's table as Fe; colloquially: (almost) any alloy that contains mostly iron. In reality, everything that is called "iron" is either some steel, or some cast iron. I am not a specialist, so I cannot provide too many ...


3

The case components are each molded as a single piece, not glued from flat sheets. They're dirt cheap to purchase already made; you'll go through a lot of work to make one from scratch. Consider just buying one (or a package of them when they're practically given away on sale). If your goal is making one from scratch, solvent welding would be the way to ...


3

Many plastics, including ABS can be chemically welded. The result will be as strong as the original plastic. Thin parts may not have much surface area to join, and you may see a visible "melt" line at the repair. Joining broken parts is essentially the same process as building things with a material like Lucite. You put the pieces together with a tight-...


2

Acrylic is also very easy to scorch, for example when line bending or vacuum forming. I doubt you'd be able to melt it evenly without it getting a brown crust in places.


2

They are hardened tool steel ; per @ virolino , essentially nothing today is "iron" although many things are made of various cast irons.There are 50 different tool steel that could be used depending on what is shredded and the expected life . The practical answer is ; whatever the manufacturer uses. If you had two manufacturers offering two ...


2

You can find plans for making various shredding machines by using the terms "metal shredding machine plans" which will also present a number of plans for similar machines for shredding plastic. The difference would be the thickness of the shredding wheels and especially the shape of the teeth and the power of the motor. There were too many returns ...


1

The way I see it, even the base material is not cut / prepared really properly. Even if you make a very good stitching, there is a chance that the material itself will fail during the next "shocking experiences". I would do it in two steps: stitch as good as possible, to make sure that the sand will stay inside. Please stitch each layer individually, for ...


1

Before going farther, there are some plastics that can be safely melted at home with good ventilation as long as you use the right procedure (warm it slowly and don't exceed the temperature needed to melt it), and some plastics that give off toxic fumes when they melt, so you should never try to melt those indoors. Do your research. The question asks about ...


1

My computer won't let me see the picture, so this answer might not be helpful. Assuming we're talking about the regular party blowers, the only issue with trying to add a reed to make noise are space and ability. There's not that much space for it to go, only about an inch in the plastic tip, but the tube is very small. Second is actually getting it in there....


1

You probably won't be able to get professional-looking results with DIY lamination. Thermal Lamination For thermal lamination, the thinnest common thickness is 1.5 mil (38 microns), which a number of companies offer. USI has 1.3 mil film, also. USI once sent me a sample 9"x12" pouch of 1.5 mil film. It kept curling and rolling up around the adhesive side; ...


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