9

I think the main reasons the curviness seems lacking is because the contrast is too high or uneven, and your hatching doesn't follow the curves of the body. The quite abrupt ending of the shading on the breast(s) - the upper part, that seems to be erased with a kneaded eraser in a dotted way, and the dark area of the person's right breast (image 1) - gives ...


8

This is meant as an addition to Joachims answer, so I won't repeat what he already pointed out. I'm sorry if this sounds nitpicky, but it seems to me like you start the process of drawing with the contour of the person, then you add the outlines of the strongest shadows to give the flat contour some dimension and lastly you fill the outline with different ...


6

There are a couple of ways that you can go about matching... The first is trial and error testing on scrap paper. It's tried and true, really, because all you do is look at the color options in your set and get close, then work with additional blending with other colors to match up. Take notes. :) The more "scientific" way is to use an application like ...


5

Yes, you can mix medias. But you need to preserve some of the tooth of your paper's surface to successfully transition from working with graphite to charcoal. The tooth of your paper determines how well things will catch and hold to the surface of the paper. As you pass your pencil, or charcoal, across the paper's surface little bits of the drawing tool ...


5

In it's basic form you are looking to choose your shading technique based on what you want your end result to look like. I only draw in pencil and usually that is a mechanical pencil or a basic HB2. Most of what I will refer to here is the first drawing book I really read and used: Dragons: Learn to draw step by step There are different types of shading ...


4

This ultimately comes down to the skills of observation that you acquire through practice. One of the fundamental purposes of life drawing as an exercise is to train yourself to closely observe what is there rather than what you know or expect to be there. Although we tend to think of our vision as being like a camera, in reality a lot of what we 'see' is ...


4

Don't think of it as "shade according to contour" but think instead as "shade defines contour". It's the sudtle changes in colour values across the surface of a form which allows the artist to see the true shape of the form. If the value of the shade/shadow remains exactly the same across the entire form then the form would look more like a flat surface then ...


4

Remember that white only looks white when there is 'white' light (light containing a wide range of wavelengths, I won't go into details here) that it can reflect. Even snow can look dark. For realistic shading, you have to know what the subject you are drawing, looks like. So, find examples. Look at yourself in a mirror when it's dark outside, use a lamp to ...


4

Creating detailed outlines of features and then fleshing them out can often lead you to draw yourself into a corner - you'll put a lot of detail into a particular spot and find that it's off (I've done this countless of times, it never gets any less frustrating). You asked if you should try to plot shadows and shapes and this is a great way to work -- ...


4

What are hatching and cross-hatching? This article from the Drawing Magazine explains the basic idea of hatching and cross-hatching: At its most basic, hatching, also called hachure, refers to setting down a pattern of short, rhythmic, parallel lines close together and evenly spaced in order to darken a passage or increase the sense of form in a drawing. ...


3

I am no professional artist and don't draw any portraits, but I hope to offer you some insights free of prejudice and textbook mantras. The woman on top doesn't look weird, masculine or ugly, she is just shaded unnaturally. Light source Every highlight and shadow depends on where your main source of light is positioned. In the lower drawing the woman is ...


3

The shading techniques you mentioned are generally used in pen and ink artwork. This is commonly visible in comic strips (printed in newspapers). There is no need for these techniques in pencil, since graphite is easily smoothed into a steady transition from one color to another. Ink does not smear the way graphite does and you cannot effectively shade an ...


3

Shading Techniques First of all, the shading techniques you mentioned are primarily used for pen-and-ink projects and are not commonly used when shading with a pencil. Special techniques like the ones you mentioned are required for pen and ink projects because pens don't naturally provide a way to fade from light to dark the way graphite does. Since an area ...


3

You may need to practice working from photographs that are less 'lingerie catalogue'. To my eye, this photo looks as though the model's chest has been digitally enlarged. Notice how the skin just above the bra on the left breast is slightly more shaded than the skin above it, and that the shading follows the bra-line rather linearly. That seems unlikely to ...


2

You can also use different grades of pencils to change the tone of the work - also known as blending (an introduction to art techniques, glossary). To accomplish this sort of blending you use different pencil grades. The best example of shading and tone transition that I've seen is in The Art of Pencil Drawing, by Gene Franks. He uses an H, F, HB, B, 3B,...


2

Picture the line that would be created by the intersection of a plane with the shape you are trying to get a contour of. This resulting edge is a (literal) contour line. For example a contour or topographical map shows elevations across an area. Each line on the map is where a plane at the given altitude cuts the landscape. The idea is the same with an ...


2

The "planes of the head" are the simplification of the constant curving of the head into areas that share a similar orientation. Meaning, take the curved surfaces of the head and flatten those surfaces to get the fewest flat areas while preserving the basic volume of the head. Think of the forehead, it is basically one big area that faces in a certain ...


2

Add high contrast polka-dots all over the car. This will totally upstage the hand painted areas and make the fact that they don't match moot. It could be any other pattern, like zig-zagging lines, but polka-dots are the most effective due to the euphoria polka-dots trigger in the human mind. BTW - You will never be able to just cheaply match an original or ...


2

The rough texture side is good at "grabbing" and creating friction. So it is better for things like pencils/graphite and for allowing it to deposit into the texture of the paper. The smooth side is better for precise application of liquid medium such as inks. The texture side will be good at holding layers of powder medium such as soft pastels, and allowing ...


2

Stereotypical masculine features include an overall more rigid structure, larger bones (especially jawbone), more distinct jaw and neck muscles. Stereotypical feminine features include an overall softer structure, higher eyebraws, smaller jawbone. Of course this is an oversimplification; in reality stereotypical masculine and feminine features are more ...


2

I wonder what you mean by highlighting a sketch? If you work on a white (or almost white) paper then the only thing you gonna need is a soft (6b) pencil or even cheaper a regular HB penci to start. But I recommend a 6B. If you gonna work on a toned paper or cardboard then be aware that chalk won't work well on graphite. Also a black and a white one will ...


1

It is hard to put into words exactly how to describe what the book is describing. Like stated above, 'you just have to practice.' When looking at the page posted above, I also struggled in understanding the concept as well(long ago) and find it very confusing. Instead of seeing it as planes, I tried to see it as more coloration, like topographic maps. ...


1

I would recommend using a white wax crayon or even better a white artists pastel. They are pretty cheap... Now that I think about it, you should do well to also get a quite soft pencil like a 6b instead of the 4b - because the difference is quite real.


1

In practice, there are two main approaches to drawing light with a permanent medium. Negative Light. This is most likely what you're trying to do, because the supplies are much more available. For dark scenes, this is the hard road. Here, you are starting from a white ground, typically the color of the paper. This means you want the whitest, brightest page ...


1

I would advise against starting with the features or even the shadows first. I have found from experience that it is the "general shape" of the head that houses all of the other features in some kind of semblance. For instance, if the shape of the head is slightly widened, it will affect the length and shape of the nose in relation to other features. Which, ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible