31

Punch it Given the size of the holes you are doing this might not seem like useful advice but I would bet that this is what the artist in the picture did, as those are not perfect circles. Outside of this you could use a small punch to get a perfect circle. The way you get that to work is put a lot of paper (or some other thick material) underneath so that ...


14

A big factor to this would be to make sure your cuts are straight and not at an angle. If your cuts meet on top but are not completely vertical then a tuft would appear on the bottom of the paper, for example. This can be hard to work with since the blade of a craft knife is already at an angle. This leads into one possible solution. Depending on what you ...


12

It really does depend on how big the circle is. For tiny circles I recommend not using the knife at all. Find a pair of compasses (or, in a pinch, a dried-up pen or sharp pencil will do), and use that to punch a hole in the paper. Of course, you can also use the knife in much the same way, by poking the hole with the tip of the knife. Note that this ...


10

Self healing cutting mat I use this for all my craft cutting. You want to be sure that the surface you are cutting on is completely uniform so as to not cause your cutting hand to hesitate or jump. These mats are for just that. Also has the added feature of not cutting up your parent's table. They are usually textured on both side to prevent both the mat ...


9

You are using a typical tool by having an Xacto knife in hand. If your results are poor, please consider that the blade may be dull. New blades are sharp enough to result in very clean cuts, while an even slightly dull blade will pull the material being cut. If you don't wish to exhaust your finances by purchasing new blades at every turn, consider to ...


8

The Cricut and similar machines such as the Cameo Silhouette use very sharp knife blades mounted in a manner to allow the tip to rotate to follow the direction of movement. They are nearly perfect for the pictured type of work. You may find it necessary to experiment somewhat to get ideal machine settings for your specific paper type, but that is easily ...


8

How to cut a tiny hole using a knife: (This method requires a very steady hand and caution.) Draw the hole. You can use whatever technique you want. If you want to avoid people seeing marks, you can draw and cut the hole from the reverse side. I have also used a scoring tool instead, as this leaves no marks afterward. Use the correct blade. I use blade 11 ...


8

This will probably work well for decently-small sized holes that are around 2 mm in diameter: These things can be pretty useful. You often see them in paper cutting three of them at a time, so you can put them into your binders and duo tangs. If you've got a decent quality hole punch, you should be able to make clean cut holes without any bending - and ...


7

Blade You want to have a sharp knife with a sharp angle. For example, I found this image on Aliexpress but don't know about this particular store. The left blade is more stable than the right one, in my experience, but is also more difficult to find. As you can see, the blades can be replaced. This should be done rather often. Especially for fine details ...


6

This may simply be called papercutting! From Papercutting on Wikipedia: Papercutting or paper cutting is the art of cutting paper designs. The art has evolved uniquely all over the world to adapt to different cultural styles. Silhouette can refer to the art of cutting outlines or portraits out of black paper. [...] Contemporary papercutting is ...


5

One strong contender is tyvek. It can be cut like paper, but is much tougher, water resistant, and has a class A flammability rating, according to Wikipedia. The problem is keeping it folded. The kirigami-made-of-tyvek links I'm finding are scientific papers that mention bonding the tyvek to a heat-shrink plastic (presumably on the valley fold side of each ...


5

In addition to Matt's answer which explains how to avoid tufts, here is what I do when a tuft is made anyway: With a brand-new blade (should be as sharp as possible for this), go from the other side of the paper and scrape switfly along the tuft. You should of course make sure the paper cannot move. Don't try to cut, because the cut will not be continuous. ...


4

You could try using a sewing needle or dressmaker's pin, repeatedly pricking the paper along the circumference of the circle. That would effectively result in a very closely perforated circle. Then lightly press against the circle using some other blunt-tipped tool, and it should eventually pop out.


4

In Dutch traditional paper cutting only a fine pair of scissors was used, very pointy ones which were sharp over the whole length of the blades. To cut very small holes the paper would be folded over the center of the hole and only that little bit pinched. Then a semi circle would be cut on the fold so that when unfolded the hole would be a circle. I bet it ...


4

Other resources I can suggest are these: http://www.1001fonts.com/stenciled-fonts.html https://www.urbanfonts.com/fonts/stencil-fonts.htm Try out which suits your design best. Check out sites that have "free" download option for flexibility. If not free, you can redo/recreate some letters you need in Adobe Illustrator/Corel Draw, just get the letters you ...


4

I do a lot of paper cutting and, I have exstensive experience using a crafting knife. I also love cutting detailed snowflakes. I'm wondering if you have tried using a small pair of really sharp scissors that come to a point and the cutting surface cuts all the way to the tip of the point. It was a god send when I discovered the exsistence of this type of ...


3

If you have a makerspace in your area or a similar craft related activity/club, you may be able to gain use of a craft cutter such as the Silhouette Cameo or a Cricut product. Still associated with the makerspace, you may find members with a laser cutter. Stretching the application a bit means you could also use a flatbed CNC machine to make the straight and ...


3

This is known by several names such as paper cutting, paper carving, folk cutting, Wycinanki(Polish), Schereneschnitte (In German meaning scissor cuts), and Knippen ( by the Dutch). In Japan Mon Kiri involves folding and cutting paper. In 105CE Chinese invented paper like or simalar to what we call paper. It was considered a valued commodity and wasn't cut ...


3

I like dafont.com. Searching for 'stencil' turns up a decent number of stencil/'Army' style fonts, many of which look like they could plausibly work as actual stencils.


2

From the image of the white lamp shade i think the tabs are not interlocking, but rather interlaced and glued. Proper interlocking would not need gluing .. for instance if the tabs where cut as trapezoids and the two edges joined by a series of folding actions to hook the wider ends into narrower inner edges of each tab. In the other images i suspect they ...


2

You can use old bullet casings as punches, in a pinch. Hit them with a ball peen hammer.


2

Xacto knife is the artist standard for cutting mats when mounting pictures. Mats are made from a very thick cardstock. You already have the stencil, you may want to get a French Curve ruler. That helps with stability while cutting. LINKS See the xacto website for knives & blade options. There’s a wiki link about french curves. Also an article about ...


1

As many have described in the comments, there are a variety of computer-guided cutting machines, ranging from the cricket and silhouette level machines which are designed for home use, to more serious home-manufacturing devices like the silver bullet. These devices differ from each other in terms of price, the size of media they can work with and the variety ...


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