8

There are a few tricks of the trade for using tape on drawing paper. Here are some of them: Use good quality paper. Try using different types of tape to see which kind works best with the type of paper you're using. Stick the tape to your pants one or more times before sticking it to the paper. Don't leave the tape on the paper for more than 24 hours. ...


7

Cyan, magenta and yellow are actually the primary colors you should use when painting with inks and paints. (I'm surprised we didn't have this kind of question asked before, because most of us are taught the wrong primary colors in school and by paint manufacturers) Fair warning: the information in the following section is WRONG but it's what most people ...


7

Yes, that concern is very valid, and it has always been a problem in any school art room I've ever been to (even though we used only water paints in school). You should never wash big amounts of paint down the drain. The safer method is to simply let it dry and dispose of the remains in the household waste. Bigger amounts should be left to dry in a ...


7

There's painters tape designed to seal much better with latex paint (e.g., Frogtape); it has a material that sucks up water and gels on contact so water-based paint can't flow past the edge. However, it's designed to work with smooth surfaces. On a rough surface like concrete, high spots keep any kind of tape from making good contact with low spots. To get ...


7

Masking tape is the general term for a kind of tape for masking off parts of a range of materials (wood, stone, glass, concrete, &c.). The glue will need to have a certain level of bonding (often pressure-bonding) with the surface for it to stay in place and keep the paint from covering - or seeping in on - that surface. The amount of bonding is ...


6

After applying the masking tape, first apply another layer of your base coat paint. Any bleeding that might occur from this, will be in the same colour as the wall and thus be invisible and will clog any holes between masking tape and the wall. In the second step block in the stencil with your desired colour.


5

As a non-native English speaker I'm not too familiar with the expression 'pushing values', but I think the intent goes both ways, that is to say, it doesn't mean pushing them in one direction, but in both (or all) directions. Pushing one's values too far either results in a high-contrast image, where all values have been replaced by binary values (resulting ...


5

I think it's hard to judge the real difference between the paintings your nephew made and the example of the goal he has in mind: the first are taken in what seems a yellowish light, while the second is colour corrected (at least, it seems to have a proper white balance set) and taken in bright light. Assuming both the eyes of the giraffe and the fur on the ...


4

For this particular project the consistency of the paint is the most important. It must be a soft paste that sticks to the hand and to the canvas. If the paint is too thick, just add a drop of water at a time. If the paint is too liquid, you'll end up with splashes and incomplete handprints. With children that age you can use almost any type of paint, like: ...


4

If they wear clothes you don't mind ruining (good quality acrylic paint will not wash out of cloth completely, ever) and you supervise and help them wash off the paint afterward and put down a large drop cloth to protect carpet/wooden floors (tile is cleanable), or do it outside, student grade acrylics should be fine. At those ages they are unlikely to try ...


4

There are many types of frames for paintings. It's true for the classical painting frame that it overlaps, and I don't think it will increase as the size of the painting increases. With mats you face the exact same problem: mats won't cover part of your painting in addition to the frame - they usually just have rabbets of their own in which the artwork is ...


4

Technically this is not an answer, because I don't know how to make colors "glow" after the painting is finished. My best bet is to try a glossy varnish. The main reason why the paintings don't glow is that they don't reflect enough light. Two main causes for that come to my mind: The wood beneath the paints absorbs light. He should prime the wood ...


3

You could make it work from a single vantage point, but not from numerous or continuously changing vantage points. Whatever shape sticks out from the wall (semicylinder or other), I'll call that the protrusion. Imagine that it was transparent so you could see through it to the features you need to reproduce, such as the line where the wall meets the floor, ...


3

Use acrylic paint as an underpainting. It can be safely used in combination with gouache. To retain as much as possible of the character of a gouache painting (the matte look and texture), I suggest diluting it nevertheless, which, in addition, will help keep an eventual underdrawing visible and improves adhesion (based on the discussion here, it otherwise ...


3

In one school I went to, we had an extra part in the drain from the sink (kitchen sink style.) From the sink the water would get into a container, the top and the bottom of the container had little walls making separate compartments and only the middle of the container had the exit to the main drainage pipes. The heavy and very light parts of the waste '...


3

Let me get a little bit into the weeds of how color vision and color blindness work to provide a better understanding of how color blindness could affect art ability and success. "Color blindness" actually covers a lot of different conditions characterized by a reduced or altered perception of at least some colors, but I'll stick with the most ...


3

They probably covered the tile in white glaze and then used a paint brush or sponge stamps to apply the blue glaze on top of the dried (but not fired) white glaze. Unfortunately the only source I could find is a German documentary without any subtitles, but starting at 28:10 it clearly shows a potter applying different patterns by sponging pigmented engobe ...


3

The paint needs to be thin and uniform for air brushing. That looks like clumps of paint. A few conditions can cause that: The paint is too thick. The paint isn't uniformly thinned, so some of what the air brush sprays is "chunks" and sputters rather than mist. Too much solvent is evaporating on the way to the surface (choice of solvent, amount ...


2

It was confirmed to be a forgery. The most recent news I could find about the story was from 2019, but it indicates that experts had determined that the painting, as well as a number of others sold by Giulano Ruffini, was a modern forgery. The first painting identified in the case was a Lucas Cranach the Elder Venus, seized by French authorities during a ...


2

TL;DR It isn't necessary or advantageous to build your pallet on CMY colors based on paint being subtractive color. Using only CMY colors will be a disadvantage compared to RYB because you won't be able to create as big a range of mixed colors, and some mixed colors won't be as vibrant. The Details Are there any downsides when painting with a cyan-magenta-...


2

Don't worry about drafting tape if you can't find it in your area. A common hack - peel masking tape, stick it a couple of times on another surface (say, your hand) to remove some adhesive, and then use it on the paper. Make sure the initial surface is clean, though, we don't want dirt on the paper ;)


2

The fan-shaped brush is perfect for blending oil paints. I use it to either blur fresh paint (be it an area or a detail) into the background, or to create a smooth gradient between paints. When painting with very fatty paints, or simply a lot of paint, this brush will lose its efficiency, as it is too thin and fine to manipulate, accumulate, or contain much ...


2

Poster colors are water-soluble and can be reactivated. They are also relatively opaque, compared to other watercolours. But even though this type of paint might seem suitable for glazing and layering, you have to be careful when doing so, since the new colour can easily mix with the underlying one. Like gouache and watercolours, working with poster colours ...


2

It depends on the context. In your example, Raphael's fresco The School of Athens, the gesture is made by Plato, the ancient Greek philosopher. He is pointing upwards because his philosophical inquiries (as outlined in his Theory of Forms) have led him to conclude that the true nature of things is of a higher order than reality as we perceive it. His pupil ...


2

That may be the plastic itself rather than paint. Molding the parts using colored plastic and a mold with a mirror finish produces a surface like that. Getting that kind of finish with paint basically requires "polishing" the paint. It is sanded with extremely fine sandpaper (grit in the thousands), then polishing compound, and buffed. It's ...


1

The fan brush is also very useful to paint lots of fine texture. Bob Ross often used a fan brush to paint bushes or foliage on trees and waterfalls. You can use the same technique to paint either a rough texture of numerous tiny dots (like distant grass, leaves, rock, sea foam) or a smooth texture of fine, parallel lines (like hair, fur, water, grass and ...


1

A transparent protective layer would be ideal. I propose acryllic based coatings because they bond well with the painting and are soft enough to not chip away when bumped into. They are also elastic enough to not indent permanently, unless you have a go at them with a sharp object. Glossy acryllic varnish or Mod Podge are ideal. Instead of slapping a single, ...


1

You used the term "glow", but as others have pointed out, what you're referring to is making the colors pop; making them more vivid and with more depth ("glowing" requires that they emit their own light, which can be done but that's not what you're looking for here). Even if your cousin did make the colors literally glow in the second ...


1

Acrylic is better by a mile for ease of learning. It is very forgiving as it only requires water to dilute. Plus it is versatile as it can do anything that other paints can do; it can be used thickly to replicate oil paint, it can be diluted to be used like watercolor and it can be used for matte color like gouache. It dries quickly too and can be painted ...


1

I know this is 4 years old thread, but if this helps anyone, based on scanning and sampling I got the below: 101 White (RGB): #f5f7fb 102 Cream (RGB): #f2f3b9 103 Ivory (RGB): #f2f4e6 104 Light Yellow Glaze (RGB): #feff5b 105 Light Cadmium Yellow (RGB): #fefd5c 106 Light Chrome Yellow (RGB): #fdf861 107 Cadmium Yellow (RGB): #fef638 108 Dark Cadmium Yellow (...


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