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5

I think it's hard to judge the real difference between the paintings your nephew made and the example of the goal he has in mind: the first are taken in what seems a yellowish light, while the second is colour corrected (at least, it seems to have a proper white balance set) and taken in bright light. Assuming both the eyes of the giraffe and the fur on the ...


4

Technically this is not an answer, because I don't know how to make colors "glow" after the painting is finished. My best bet is to try a glossy varnish. The main reason why the paintings don't glow is that they don't reflect enough light. Two main causes for that come to my mind: The wood beneath the paints absorbs light. He should prime the wood ...


4

You can fire artwork on porcelain and it will be permanent. Pretty much any other surface won't be. Even commercially applied artwork wears off and washes off eventually. If you know the actual surface material/finish (like by contacting the manufacturer), you can optimize the decoration for adhesion and durability. You can protect the decoration by ...


4

There are a number of ways to preserve pencil drawings. This question is explicit in distinguishing that the drawings were purchased, which introduces another consideration. A common way to preserve pencil drawings is with a fixative. How can I protect my pencil & charcoal drawings once complete? goes into recommendations and discussion on that ...


3

I'd try polyurethane varnishes. They are weatherproof, contrary to standard acrylic varnishes, they are transparent, but may absorb a bit of UV light, as UV is sometimes a catalyst to the reaction to form them (source : wikipedia) (only a guess here, as I didn't find valuable PU absorption spectrum). It is also stated that polyurethanes with isocyanates ...


3

This happens with many semi-liquid products that are packed in tubes, not just paint. I notice it with some cosmetics and skin creams as well. It's nearly impossible to open a tube without compressing it, which pressurizes it and causes the contents to come spurting out. One solution is to store the tube with the cap pointing up. This way you usually get an ...


3

Initially, the gushing of the paint is due to the small amount of water that generally is part of the product's formula. This quote from handprint.com explains the reason and effect: Paints are manufactured with excess water in the vehicle, as this reduces the viscosity of the vehicle and decreases the amount of time (labor) and electrical energy necessary ...


3

Mylar sleeves for storage are the most common way comics collectors protect original art, being the sturdiest and least likely to cause chemical damage to the paper. Mylar and acid-free cardboard are pretty much your first line of defense with anything comics-related. See also: https://www.comicartfans.com/comic-art-collecting-caring.asp I've attended San ...


3

I'd use Krylon Fusion but I do the prep work, even though they claim you don't have to. I originally used it because I was told (by someone at a store that specialized in aquariums) that it's aquarium-safe once cured. It can stand being submerged in water for years and, not that you need this for your application, it won't leech nasty chemicals into the ...


2

I have about 15 tubes of Shiva casein paint tubes that were left in a box in my garage for 8 years, I am mainly an oil painter, never try to paint with acrylics or casein. So I tried them, they were a bit thick but I added few drops of water and I was flabbergasted, they all were good, they dry way too fast for my painting style, but I am going to learn how ...


2

Use a hot glue gun with clear glue to seal the side holes all the way around and then paint with a clear sealant.


2

Not much adheres to nylon. Umbrella fabric with a tight weave also won't provide an opportunity for paint to get through pores and lock itself to the material. The weave will provide more surface area than a smooth film, but I wouldn't expect paint to stick long term unless you can find some designed for nylon. There's something you could try (haven't ...


2

I haven't tested how permanent it is, but I hydro-dipped a variety of cups, including some stainless steel cups. What I did, after taping off the sections I wanted to protect, is to spray on some primer geared for metals. Once the primer was dry, I dipped the cups (I used spray paint floated on water), took off the mask tape, and waited for them to dry. Then ...


1

You used the term "glow", but as others have pointed out, what you're referring to is making the colors pop; making them more vivid and with more depth ("glowing" requires that they emit their own light, which can be done but that's not what you're looking for here). Even if your cousin did make the colors literally glow in the second ...


1

most cups are coated with an epoxy resin food safe than you can paint before coating or use a vinyl on the cup and than 100 safe and will last oh and than you need a turner / spinner to keep the resin even when coating


1

If instead you choose the stainless steel finish mug you'll know what the surface is, and be able to choose a paint. The others may well be powder-coated (and baked) rather than enamelled. With stainless I'd use paints intended for exterior metals, bought more as building supplies than craft supplies. Unfortunately tins will be rather large, and colours ...


1

I would say you are limited to using oil based paints to do this. You cannot paint acrylics over oils as the paint will later peel off or flake away. My suggestion is to buy a small inexpensive set of oil paint tubes. You can can buy an art set for as little as $20AUD. After the paint has thoroughly dried, give it 2 or 3 coats of an outdoor varnish to seal ...


1

Wood is live material and unless you wrap it in something like hard lack deeply soaked into or acrylic resin, then it will wrap a bit here and there according to grain orientation. So it depends on what is your tolerance and how big warp is still OK for you. As you plan to go with oil painting, I would stick to the oils not reinventing wheel. Lighter the oil,...


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