7

Oil pastels work well on paper with a fairly high tooth level. It helps it "grab" the color -- a "toothier" paper is better than a smoother paper. I'll borrow this diagram I used in a similar answer. You want pretty rough paper (but not quite the roughest), but somewhat smoother than you might have used for regular pastels. Image from Hello Artsy: How to ...


7

So the main considerations for storing oil pastels are: The individual pastels are kept separate, so that they do not bleed into one another They are kept reasonably cool (room temperature, ~20ÂșC is fine) If the latter is a problem, just keep them in the fridge (although you'll want to allow them to warm up a bit before using them). As for the former, if ...


6

One way to simply keep your thumb clean is to wrap it in a paper towel or cloth. This doesn't really resolve the problem of thumb size, however -- indeed, it makes your thumb larger. For finer detail work, a tortillion would be better. This is a rolled-up piece of paper that tapers to a point. This is much like Zizouz212's suggestion of an eraser, but ...


6

One method is to use a small piece of the pastel and some solvent to create an 'oil paint' and with a brush complete the high detail components. Oil pastel pigment can be manipulated with a brush moistened in white spirit, turpentine, linseed oil, or another type of vegetable oil or solvent. Alternatively, the drawing surface can be oiled before drawing ...


5

If you're able, a Tracer projector could suit your needs. You place it over a small sketch and it magnifies it. No digital images required. Any other kind of normal digital projector will work too - although the resolution might not be as good. Overhead Projectors (these) are great too, either sketch onto a transparency, or you can buy special transparencies ...


5

With oil pastels, I've actually found that using an eraser will help smudge it. If you have a fine eraser, that's decently thin, you should be able to use it to smudge in small areas. When you want to move on to another colour, you may need to eraser the tip off, but it lasts a good while and it's always given me great results. You should be able to find ...


5

The problem is not in your drawing - it's in the pastels. There are some media in which the quality of the materials you use make a huge difference, and oil pastels is one of them. (I also didn't like the childish way my pastel drawings looked, but getting a set of Faber Castel oil pastels changed it all.) So if you are into oil pastels, I'd suggest you get ...


4

It will work, as high temperatures melt the crayons, regardless of the device you use, but in all cases I'd suggest doing it in a well-ventilated room or outside, as the fumes are a little toxic. Also note that holding the crayon in one hand while doing so is asking for trouble: wear a glove, or attach the crayon sturdily to something. I'm sure crayons ...


4

user18894 is correct in that the quality of your media is reflected in the quality of the art work but there are some other things you could consider. First the paper you use is very important. You should try something with more "tooth," that is roughness, that can grab the pastels and add texture to the drawing. Any plate paper, one that is perfectly smooth,...


3

I can tell you with certainty that architecture like this does exist, is still being built and is pretty common in Europe, for example in Halle or Leipzig, Germany. You can also see examples of it in Normandy (France). The technique of mortaring brick and coating it with cement or mud is pretty common. I imagine the biggest problem you will have is finding ...


3

To me the proportions look right. I think your problem is the contrast in color between the tip of the nose and the skin above the upper lip. In your reference picture there is a very soft and gradual blend from nose to upper lip. The lightest color is on the very tip of the nose, where most of the light is reflected. The parts of the nose that physically ...


2

The nose may not be the problem, it may just be inheriting one. Check the space between the eyes and the mouth. I find it is a common problem in my own drawing to make that distance too long and that looks like the problem here. It sometimes helps to look at the composition with slightly unfocused eyes, then proportions that do not seem natural stand out....


1

Baby oil/mineral oil will never dry by evaporation like turpentine or mineral spirits ( AKA naptha , VM & P). It will not polymerize like boiled linseed oil or plain linseed oil. It may be drawn into the paper or canvas which could appear to be drying.


1

If you don't want the artwork destroyed, then yes. Any contact with unfixed pastel (oil or chalk) will smudge it. This includes contact through the plastic bags you're dropping the art into. An artist-grade, archival-quality spray fixative should cause minimal color changes to your drawing, and proper handling will prevent any health issues. In selecting ...


1

When I used pencil, oil pastel, marker, pen & color pencil to design an artwork relate to this kind of stuff before, it is a good result. It like Rock n roll, urban, entertainment, graffiti kind of feeling. You can sketch some rock graffiti on other paper first based on something look like these https://www.google.com/search?client=tablet-android-...


1

Oil pastels work well on many surfaces, so I would suggest you try a variety of papers and other substrates and see which you like best. A usefull site discussing this topic can be found here.


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