8

2-part epoxy is my usual recommendation when it comes to mating different kinds of materials together. That is usually one of the selling points. I would caution with the use of Gorilla Glue for this. While is might be a viable choice you need to be careful of its expansion properties. If you do try to use it make sure you clamp appropriately and clean any ...


3

I use G-S Hypo Cement which works excellent it is somewhat expensive. E-6000 is also a good choice.


3

I think that a great way to transfer the shape to the wood would be to use a rubbing to create an outline of the space which you can then cut out of the paper and transfer to the wood. This is sort of reminiscent of how Indiana Jones saved the instructions for finding the grail from the shield under the library: You can use either a crayon or chalk or ...


2

I don't want to focus on creating the shape outline as Catija's answer is a very simple approach for something like this. If this was a little bit different then other options might be viable as well. Perhaps using Plasticine or silicone to create a mold of the void. It would allow you to trace around the mold you create and get a gauge on depth. Unless you ...


1

Epoxy is the best choice. Remember surface preperation is more important than the bonding agent. Wood, use good tac rag, but use 120 grit red garnet paper for a rough up, some wood fibers for the epoxy to grab. The wook should also be "dry" under 12% moisture contentant. Metal, scuff also, no less than 120 grit Silicon Carbide (black) sand paper. Then ...


1

Epoxy is certainly a good default for wood to metal joints, it also has the advantage in this application that it can be used to fill small gaps between the inlay an the surround and can be coloured or filled (eg with sawdust from the same wood or metal powder) to further disguise the join. One downside of fluid adhesive is that it is quite difficult to ...


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