8

Several suggestions: Knit a matching strip in a thinner yarn at a tighter gauge. Sew the strip onto the stocking after stitching letters onto it. That way you have more stitches per inch, so you can fit more letters in using duplicate stitch. Since the letters will be shorter, arrange them diagonally so they don't look lost in the middle of that tall strip. ...


7

Unlike natural fibers which can be blocked by simply shaping the item while wet, blocking acrylic requires heat. Many people try to wet-block acrylic the same way they would do wool, and they aren't happy with the results so they conclude (incorrectly) that there's no point in blocking acrylic. That's not true. There's simply very little point in wet ...


6

Evenly spaced stitches means that the number of stitches between increases is approximately the same. Since you are increase 50 sts over 94 current stitches, and 94/50=1.88 you should put (on average) 1.88 sts between increases. That means your increases will be done in some combination of (m1,k1) and (m1,k2) repeats. There are helpful calculators available ...


5

You could, if running out of yarn and the small amount would save you. But after unraveling you should steam (or wash if the yarn does not change by that) to relax the yarn, otherwise you may get a different look as the yarn is no longer straight. (Thanks fixer 1234, your remark is now included.) Swatches store easily and will provide repair yarn later.


5

With names such as Joe and Deb, it's easy to see that they work well in the current position. The longer name of Geraldine requires greater flexibility in the design. The first thought is to place the name in a vertical position, but I suspect that would make for difficult stitching? The next thought is to create a tag separately from the stocking, perhaps ...


3

The author of the pattern was kind enough to write me back and I learned two things: The cast-on had to be done as a cable cast-on I was making the mistake of casting on 3 stitches and then casting off the subsequent 3 stitches (and turning my work in the process), when I actually just needed to cast them on and then immediately cast those same stitches off ...


3

I tried the instructions from your pattern as written, and it gave me a single hole with a string running across it. That string would be a problem in a real mitten, but it might be okay for a decorative one. Presumably the pattern will have you pick up stitches around the edge of the hole and knit a thumb. I have no idea how you're getting 3 holes. Please ...


3

If your pattern tells you to unravel your caston, it should have also told you to start with a provisional caston. A provisional caston is a method that allows you do easily unravel the caston, turning the beginning of the work into live stitches. Here's a link to one method of provisional caston. It sounds like maybe you didn't do a provisional caston (oops)...


3

That sweater is probably made on a knitting machine, but you can reproduce the look on knitting needles. It looks like either fisherman's rib or brioche stitch, with added tuck stitches every 3 or 4 rows. To make a tuck stitch, instead of knitting into the next live stitch, you knit into that stitch and the stitch below it. Brioche and tuck stitches are a ...


3

This is a matter of personal preference. Some people always re-use their swatches to save yarn; others never reuse their swatches for a variety of reasons. I fall somewhere in the middle. I usually re-use my swatch for smaller items that only use a ball or two of yarn, items like hats, mittens, and socks. For larger items (like sweaters) that require many ...


2

I hope you were able to figure something out! If you're talking about carrying the red yarn up as you knit the green stripe, you could do something very similar every other row on the right side as you did when catching your floats; twist or wrap the red yarn around the green once before you begin working the row. This is (slightly) better hidden from the ...


2

I haven't done a ton of blocking, but since I can't wear wool I've done mostly acrylic when I do have something to block. It's true that you may not need to block it, but that's not a general rule for all scarves. If the corners are curling or there are slight width changes along the length, I would try to block that smooth. The pattern may also say ...


2

Blocking is usually a one-time process for knitwear. It's used to even out the stitches in a single piece and to stretch several pieces to make the seams fit exactly before sewing them together. If your knitting is tight and even enough for your taste or the pieces fit just fine, you can get away without blocking at all. Blocking is especially useful for ...


2

I hope you were able to find a good solution! I know that with the kind of skeins that Matt linked, you'll almost always get a frustrating (and huge) amount of yarn barf. Once I had nearly half a skein of it because the center-pull line got tucked into a weird place! Anyway, I've found that a good solution, if you don't have a yarn winder and don't intend ...


1

Here is a chart for metric/US/UK conversions with crochet hook sizes as welll: Metric(mm) US UK Crochet 2.0 1 14 -- 2.25 1 13 B 2.5 1.5 -- -- 2.75 2 12 C 3.0 2.5 11 -- 3.25 3 10 D 3.5 ...


1

This is extremely old... But I came here trying to find the same answer (it's one of the first results in Google). So I figured I'd post for anyone else. This answers the second question: preventing the making of a pet fur garment in the first place. So someone mentioned buying containers with holes in them for storing the yarn (to prevent hair from getting ...


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