6

Spray fixative should make the drawing more matte as well as protecting it. You could also try a layer of acrylic matte medium, sprayed or brushed, but that would be a little more involved and riskier to the original work if it cannot handle the wet medium. Either way do some test pieces before trying on the finished work. I also would recommend ...


6

Yes, you can use it if you're careful about the material and the purpose. Graphite, itself, can be purchased virtually pure. It's available in different particle sizes, but the typical graphite powder used for purposes like lubrication is also fine for art purposes. You need to distinguish between pure graphite and graphite-based materials. Graphite-...


4

If you use graphite, then you have the properties of graphite: it conducts electricity and it shines. To make it less shiny after using it, you most likely need to apply a layer of something which washes away (partially) the shine, but still leaves the drawing visible. You can try some of the following: special plastic sheet, used instead of glass, to ...


3

Fixative only takes 5-7 minutes to dry thoroughly. If the graphite drawing isn't sprayed with fixative and is shipped, it could cause smudging once the piece is rolled up. It can be common for buyers for example, to receive a rolled up piece of canvas, and get it stretched to fit a frame. Haven't heard of having a buyer spray fixative, or sealer themselves ...


3

There is no reason to assume it will cause problems as long as the fixative has had sufficient drying time (as indicated on the can or bottle). You will likely face more problems without fixating it, as the graphite will smudge, especially with the drawing rolled up.


3

There is a type of spray that is often used by film production teams called “dulling spray”. It is a spray that kills reflections on anything, because in movies you DO NOT WANT HIGHLIGHTS. The spray is expensive and quite a challenge to come by, as the best sprays are only distributed by photography and film equipment rental shops. If you do use it, ...


3

Vertruvian Fine Art Studio, an online drawing and painting school has a very good answer to your question, provided by instructor David Jamieson. The shininess is "burnishing" which happens when an area is worked too much or you press too hard. He says: "In my experience, there are only 3 ways to prevent your pencil drawings from becoming ...


1

Actually I doubt that there's a way to do that. Every drawing medium has its own traits and one of graphite is to be shiny. (To be honest, I like that a lot about graphite, so it's not a bad thing). Because of the different shininess I simply wouldn't use charcoal and graphite together in one picture. Using 7B instead of charcoal will give the drawing an ...


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