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10

See if you can find some adhesive vinyl with a mirrored surface. I had some a few years ago and it was every bit as reflective as the individual squares of a mirror ball. The material is meant for use in a cricut or silhouette brand vinyl cutter and is probably sold at your local art supply store. Cut the vinyl into squares the size of cracked mirror ...


4

You might be able to fix the shards in place with a clear glass glue. Please don't try superglue because it dries matte and could leave a cloudy residue on the mirrors. Use special clear glass glue instead. Another idea is crystal clear UV resin that is commonly used in crafting and for nail art. You can carefully put it on the cracked mirrors and then let ...


4

About a year ago, I created a epoxy resin based river table for my dining room involving a couple of live-edged oak panels joined by a river made from several hundred dollars worth of metallic blue colored epoxy resin. My first attempt failed miserably for a variety of reasons. I didn't adequately dry the fresh cut oak which meant that water lurked just ...


4

It would help to know the tray material and finish (a picture of the edge detail would be great), and it isn't clear whether you are referring to just the outer edge of the mosaic area or every glass tile, but here are a few ideas: If the problem is the outer perimeter of the mosaic area, remove the sharp edges with a Dremel tool and diamond disk. Clamp ...


3

I agree with Elmy's comment about glass being a bad choice for this application. But if you are intent on using it, here are some ideas. Microscope slides are roughly the width you want and can be cut to length. A skilled glass cutter (say someone who makes windows or works with stained or leaded glass), can quickly cut strips and pieces from a sheet. ...


3

I would start with a razor blade and see if you can scrape it off. If it doesn't readily scrape off, go to chemicals (below are suggestions that work with dried acrylic paint; try one at a time, do not mix them). The procedure for all of these: Cover the painted area with several layers of paper towel saturated in the chemical. Wrap that with plastic wrap ...


3

It's hard to diagnose without seeing the bit you used, but here are my ideas: Orientation The line in the center of your image has only one chipped edge on one side. That implies that the problem either arises at the side where the tool starts touching the glass or leaves the glass. If you turn the glass (or the tool) so that the rotation of the bit is ...


2

Most common would be a rotary bit. This one would be specifically for glass carving: Amazon link The bottom row would be the fine detail tips, would be beneficial to wanting to carve out small detail. Brand wise, you really can't go wrong with a rotary bit. I have been in the tool industry for about five years. Yes, you can get really high quality rotary ...


2

If you use beach glass and stones in crafts, the frosted look is actually prized, so polishing them is usually not done. You can buy glass beads in any size or color you want quite cheaply, after all. However, if you really want you beach stones/glass smooth and shiny, tumbling is probably your best bet and certainly easiest if you are going to be doing a ...


1

Flour and water, combine so it is thin enough to brush on the paper, but not so thin that it soaks the paper. Work quickly and allow to dry before touching the paper or it will shift on the glass.


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