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9

As long as the Painting isn’t recently painted, within 6-12 months, then there isn’t a general consensus and the answer is: It depends. The reason for the delay after the painting is finished is that it can take this long for the painting to fully 'dry'. In your case, this isn't a consideration. One of the biggest threats to your oil painting is the ...


6

The greatest culprit of the fading of printed colour is UV light. This process is called photo-degradation. You can protect your images by framing them using conservation glass or UV filtering Plexiglas (which can be found at most art supply stores and framing ateliers), or coat the glass you already have with UV protective spray. This process needs to be ...


6

I worked in a frame shop for several years and there are a few different ways to go about it, but some general guidelines... You don't want prints to be touching the glass. You should either mat them, or make sure to request that the framer put in spacers. Spacers are just little pieces of plastic that sit between the glass and the picture. They are ...


4

There are many types of frames for paintings. It's true for the classical painting frame that it overlaps, and I don't think it will increase as the size of the painting increases. With mats you face the exact same problem: mats won't cover part of your painting in addition to the frame - they usually just have rabbets of their own in which the artwork is ...


4

You might want to laminate your sheets before framing them. This basically means encasing them in a very thin layer of transparent plastic film, which protects the paper from damage without reducing the visibility of the pictures. You should be able to get this done quite cheaply at most stationery stores (example). Alternatively, if you think you might be ...


4

I don't recommend leaving your cross stitched projects sandwiched between glass. This compresses/flattens the stitches which can make them look odd. Taking the piece to a reputable framing shop is probably the best idea unless you make a lot of projects and want to learn how to do it yourself or if the project is relatively small. A good shop should know ...


4

Glassine is used for protecting drawings, prints, etc while shipping or storing them, and not for displaying them. The proper way to permanently frame and display your artwork would be the one suggested by @Nothingismagick. The cheaper alternative to glass that I know of is Plexiglass. Glass vs. Plexiglass Framing


4

Soft pastel is literally the most difficult "painterly" media to protect. Generally speaking, the appropriate way to protect pastels is with a so-called shadow box, where the paper or board is floated above the backing plate of the frame and still has air-space to the glass. (See my drawing below.) This is a pretty material-intensive method, but it serves ...


4

So, first, I would probably take it to a professional restoration if there was no way I was willing to risk the painting. Likely to be expensive, though, but the safest approach. If you want to try to flatten the support, you could try slowly wetting the back of matboard with sponged water, don't soak it, wet it, and then flatten under heavy pressure (...


4

Believe it or not, oil paintings actually take years to fully dry. It is a good idea to avoid glass on an oil painting the first few years of it's life for that reason. Beyond that, it's perfectly fine to use glass. It does not harm the artwork. However, no matter what you're framing, you should never allow the glass to touch the artwork. Wikihow actually ...


4

What materials you use depends on the design of the lamp shade you want to make – is it a hanging ceiling lamp, a desk lamp, etc. How sturdy the frame needs to be depends on what material it is supposed to support (paper, wood, glass, plastic, etc.) For example, if you are making a paper lamp shade, then the coat hanger wire should be fine (like in those ...


4

You don't need an outer frame. Here is a way to go about it:


3

I cut 'dots' [or squares, or bits of scrap of any shape] from 100% wool felt and glue it down with whatever "crazy glue" kind of epoxy I have at hand. None have come off in 30+ years of hanging art & moving house four times. On very pointed/raggedy corners or ill-fitted frames, I will cut a shape that covers the entire corner, not just a dot. I like ...


2

I'm not sure in what way you want to protect your art with plastic. If you want to package it so it can be seen and sold, you can get crystal-clear bags from clearbags.com. I've purchased from them and been very satisfied. They have a wide range of sizes. As "Nothingismagick" said, pastel art requires more protection than this, but watercolor, acrylic, ...


2

Keep in mind that those are general design choices, and that the purpose of a passepartout is to make your artwork stand out: if that means the borders of your passepartout are extremely small or large, or the upper border is broader than the lower one, or the left border is missing, that is completely fine. As with all things creative, it's your choice. ...


2

Some craft shops sell the hoops and the special lamp fittings 'hoop with fitting holder' in a wide range of sizes and shapes. I got them from a small independent craft shop where I live ( the Netherlands) but I am pretty sure you can buy them online now. To make fabric covered shades you either need the fitting ring, an extra hoop and sturdy (plastic?) ...


1

What I do is take old lamp shades apart if there is two layers. A layer of thick like poster board sometimes is on bottom. You can always leave it or you can create a new one with poster board. I spray painted the inside of my lamp shades gold or silver and it would just give off a very beautiful glow! I would re-cover the outside of the thick poster board ...


1

If you take it to a frame shop, they'll basically do what Catija has posted. However, there are two things I would like to add. The first being that it's not a good idea to just tack it to the board, those could become loose, another option is 'sewing' the piece. You don't actually sew it to the board, but rather pin it around the board and then sew the ...


1

A clear Mylar sheet could work. Clear, moisture resistant, acid free and archival. And available in the size and price range you are looking for. Here's an example available on Amazon https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B0027A3HKG/ref=mp_s_a_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1473127673&sr=8-1&pi=SY200_QL40&keywords=clear+mylar+roll&dpPl=1&dpID=31N50Emps-...


1

Personally, for prints, I'd recommend clip frames. They look neat, don't draw attention away from the piece, they are easy to use (you can easily do the framing yourself), easy to clean/maintain, and they are quite inexpensive. They don't offer exceptional protection, but if these are just decorative prints, and not some expensive art pieces you want to ...


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