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19

I can see black patches on it. That is a part of normal use. Those black marks are graphite, charcoal and etc. that the eraser picked up from your working surface. That is the eraser doing its job as intended. What you are supposed to do is fold / knead away those "dirty" parts back into the eraser so that non-black (the erasers original colour) parts are ...


11

I can think of four benefits of using an eraser holder: It keeps the eraser clean so it doesn't pick up body oils from handling or other contaminants. The eraser can be extended and retracted as needed, and you handle the holder rather than the eraser. It minimizes transferring dirt to the paper and potentially smearing the graphite. The holder provides ...


10

Lifting something like the Prismacolor line with a hand-held eraser is going to require a lot of elbow grease. So, when the need arises, either for a misplaced line or trying to get an effect, then the best answer is an electric eraser. There are a few options out there, Sakura makes one that is quite popular and I have the Derwent model. Are they perfect? ...


8

While there are different manufacturers and styles there is finite number of basic modern erasers. Pencil End or Rubber This is a commonly found eraser outside the drawing community. Usually pink in colour and rough in texture (due to the abrasive). This is the same eraser type that would be found on pencils with erasers. These remove graphite by ...


7

Since a kneaded eraser works by absorbing the pigment you are erasing along with a little friction to lift the stuff, to keep it healthy keep it away from things it can absorb. Like sand or dust. You also want to keep it dry. Keeping it off the carpet may not be not so much about keeping it healthy as keeping it from getting stuck in the fibers. Temperature ...


5

I'd suggest to draw your sketch on a different sheet of paper, something rather thin and inexpensive. Then you can use carbon paper to transfer your drawing to the scratchboard paper. Carbon paper is paper with a layer of carbon, this side is placed on top of the scratch board, the carbon side facing down. Now, lay your sketch on top of that. Trace the ...


5

I have not done any sort of serious scratch-board art, but here are some suggestions, to answer your two part question: Use black colored pencil instead of regular pencil.— it isn't as reflective as regular pencil, so you will just barely be able to see it while you're working. Paint over the nicks/stray pencil marks— If you paint over the scratches and ...


5

Kneaded erasers are usually perfect for erasing charcoal. However, when it comes to erasing charcoal, the success of kneaded erasers depends on a few factors: The type of paper I've experienced problems erasing charcoal from papers with very low to no grain (this includes the typical A4 printer paper, on which it is hard to draw with anything to begin with)....


4

I just tried washing one under a running tap of warm water and lots dishwashing liquid. (I kneaded the rubber while I washed it.) Mine was dark because I used it to pick up charcoal. Oddly enough it seemed to work with a small cube of rubber (5mm or 1/5"). One drawback is the consistency of the rubber became softer, so it was a little less grippy on the ...


3

I can't find any information on what exactly foam erasers are made of, but my guess would be a microporous reticulated foam (like melamine foam, for example). Foam erasers are universally lauded as being excellent in cleaning graphite off of paper, leaving (virtually) no traces, without having to put anything near as much power into the rubbing as one would ...


3

Dishwashing liquid and cold or slightly warm water works. If that doesn't solve the problem, old fashioned white toothpaste can be used to sand/buff the surface, just rinse well when you're done. Don't use hot water as it tends to soften the plastic, and let the eraser air dry for at least an hour after washing.


3

How to clean a plastic eraser? My personal choice is to use a blank piece of paper and "erase the dirt" from the eraser onto the paper. If you have shaped your eraser with a knife or sandpaper, this method will be the least destructive. There are other methods found online. Most curiously, I found a WikiHow article "3 Ways to Clean an Eraser&...


3

The color isn't really what matters, its the quality and type of eraser. Almost all erasers are dyed, so that's the only thing that effects the color. Depending on the materials you're using and types of canvas/paper, different erasers will work better. So if the black eraser was better quality, then yes, but overall, the color means nothing.


3

The "rubber" eraser you linked to actually looks like a plastic eraser. "Rubber erasers" typically refer to the type on the end of a wooden pencil or a block like the Pink Pearl eraser. There are many other types of erasers; I'll focus on just the two in the question. Just an interesting historical aside, the first erasers were made of ...


3

Generally, softer pencils are easier to erase. Even though this may seem counterintuitive, as softer pencils produce darker lines, they contain proportionally more graphite and less binder (clay). Harder pencils maintain their shape longer and tend to produce relatively finer and lighter lines: this also means they are generally applied using slightly more ...


3

The issue isn't quite as cut and dry as the title of the question. Paper comes in a range of "non-smoothness", tailored to different kinds of media and different appearances. The effectiveness of plastic erasers depends somewhat on the paper, the media you're applying to it, and using the eraser properly. Paper and Media With smooth paper, the ...


1

Both are pretty much equally easy to erase, especially between HB and 2B. It is much more about the way the mark was made than the lead it was made with that determines how easy it is to lift off. Same goes for very soft and very hard leads. A line drawn with force will drive the graphite deep into the paper fibers as well as embossing the line below the ...


1

additional to the accepted answer Accuracy If you're doing something small/fine like a technical drawing, or a piece of artwork with little space, then a rubber/eraser like this will allow precise control over the lines removed. The rubber block we've used in the past is more like a chunky child's crayon. Would you prefer thick or thin crayon for accuracy? ...


1

I use white chalk writer brand Craft decor from the Dollar Tree to draw my sketch then after im done scratching i dab away the white marks with water...if white marks remain i use a clear acrylic sealer and it works out great!


1

The type of drawing you're doing, the drawing medium and the type of paper you are using are determining factors. If you are doing technical drawings on a smooth, heavyweight paper, or paper with a "shiny" surface due to size, plastic erasers will be the way to go most of the time, although you may occasionally need a rubber eraser with some ...


1

I clean my kneaded erasers by stretching them thin like a pancake, then rubbing in dishwashing soap. I let them soak for a few hours in a dish of water, then rub and rinse under the tap. Seems to work!


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