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9

I will preface my response with a cautionary warning that I am an engineer by profession, so I am somewhat naturally inclined to use optics/physics and math to illustrate my point. Hopefully I'm enough of an artist to actually be able to illustrate this sufficiently well. Now, onwards! A person's field of vision can be described as the "cone" ...


9

I think the main reasons the curviness seems lacking is because the contrast is too high or uneven, and your hatching doesn't follow the curves of the body. The quite abrupt ending of the shading on the breast(s) - the upper part, that seems to be erased with a kneaded eraser in a dotted way, and the dark area of the person's right breast (image 1) - gives ...


8

I'm not sure what you're defining as "normal drawing paper" or "sketch paper," but you can ultimately use markers on any surface, however you will experience different results depending on the qualities of the paper. Weight Markers will generally soak into the paper and bleed to some degree (with some brands tending to bleed more than others); working with ...


8

This is meant as an addition to Joachims answer, so I won't repeat what he already pointed out. I'm sorry if this sounds nitpicky, but it seems to me like you start the process of drawing with the contour of the person, then you add the outlines of the strongest shadows to give the flat contour some dimension and lastly you fill the outline with different ...


8

The starting point is important, but there isn't a single right answer. What will work best for a given person depends on how they visualize things, and the skills they have developed. Your result turning out "not that good" is likely due mostly to not yet having developed sketching skills comparable to the artists in the videos. It takes a lot ...


8

In my drawings, the starting point is determined by the largest area(s) that roughly capture(s) the basic shape and orientation of the subject. I often represent this largest area using basic flat geometrical shapes (circle, triangle, square, rectangle, &c.) that I refine more and more - initially using straight lines - into the silhouette of the subject....


7

Do reference photos have to be the same size as my final drawing? No. Typically for individuals that begin learning to draw, they would start out in a grid method. To get a feel (muscle memory) where everything is proportionately going to be placed. Over time the hand and eye coordination will start to catch on over time. There are also other methods, such a ...


7

There are a few tricks of the trade for using tape on drawing paper. Here are some of them: Use good quality paper. Try using different types of tape to see which kind works best with the type of paper you're using. Stick the tape to your pants one or more times before sticking it to the paper. Don't leave the tape on the paper for more than 24 hours. ...


6

When you say "is it okay", that implies that there's a rule about what you can use with what, or that everybody who uses markers, uses a particular kind of paper for a reason. Any medium will have different characteristics on different kinds of paper. You probably want to avoid something that's incompatible. For example: a medium that's thick and brittle ...


6

Depends on what your problem is: If you have too many ideas and cannot commit to one, I would recommend sketching out thumbnails to then decide which one. If you feel like none of your ideas are good enough, I would recommend doing something simple to warm up. Draw the room around you or do some still life or draw a character doing something dumb. If you ...


6

As fixer1234 mentioned, in your photo reference, all the hair falls in the darkest area of the spectrum of light values. It actually won't matter once your drawing is complete: once all the light values are on a similar scale, just filling the silhouette of the hair with the darkest value you've used elsewhere in your drawing will create an effect similar to ...


6

Yes, you can use it if you're careful about the material and the purpose. Graphite, itself, can be purchased virtually pure. It's available in different particle sizes, but the typical graphite powder used for purposes like lubrication is also fine for art purposes. You need to distinguish between pure graphite and graphite-based materials. Graphite-...


6

Masking tape is the general term for a kind of tape for masking off parts of a range of materials (wood, stone, glass, concrete, &c.). The glue will need to have a certain level of bonding (often pressure-bonding) with the surface for it to stay in place and keep the paint from covering - or seeping in on - that surface. The amount of bonding is ...


6

There usually isn't a right, or wrong way of drawing per say, but getting a rough idea of where you want to put it on a piece of paper(For instance if you want to draw a full human body, or a bike) Getting a rough sketch or idea of where everything goes, makes it less of a slip up for accidentally cutting off the head and legs, because there wasn't enough ...


5

There are several different ways you can depict multiple actions taking place over time in a single panel, depending on who is doing the action, what the action entails, and which components remain constant/static over the duration of those actions. The key is that you are depicting both movement in time and space (e.g. you're showing an action that occurs ...


5

Are you trying to reproduce the "silhouette", or improve on it so hair detail is visible? The detail is all from reflected light. Hair is a shiny, textured surface. Whatever detail you see is from light being reflected from the tiny portions of the surface that reflect more of it in your direction. In a photo, if there is good lighting and sufficient ...


5

I know this isn't the official answer, but I wanted to give an easy one for people as I've been drawing with markers for years now. Marker paper. Yes it's that simple. It's pure white, and doesn't bleed or spread when you apply the tip. It also instantly absorbs the marker only where you apply the tip. Comic book art, illustrations, graphic drawing, ...


5

There is a previous discussion here: What exercises can I do to improve the line quality of my drawings? Holding a pencil is mostly up to the artist's preference. Discussed in the link above, if you want to have shorter strokes or finer detail, you would want to use more of the fingertips. If you want a more fluid motion in a line/drawing, you would want to ...


5

There is no unambiguous answer to this. You're asking after the common technique, which to me seems to be beside the real intent of your question: your choice in the size of reference images depends completely on what result you are aiming for; how you work, and; what you're comfortable with. For clarity's sake, let's limit 'reference image' to only mean ...


5

As a non-native English speaker I'm not too familiar with the expression 'pushing values', but I think the intent goes both ways, that is to say, it doesn't mean pushing them in one direction, but in both (or all) directions. Pushing one's values too far either results in a high-contrast image, where all values have been replaced by binary values (resulting ...


4

If you use graphite, then you have the properties of graphite: it conducts electricity and it shines. To make it less shiny after using it, you most likely need to apply a layer of something which washes away (partially) the shine, but still leaves the drawing visible. You can try some of the following: special plastic sheet, used instead of glass, to ...


4

It is possible to blend using markers, though like any new medium it can take some practice as well as depend on the type of marker you're using. Water-based markers Blending water-based markers requires little to no additional special equipment, just some water and a way to apply it. As you mention experience with watercolors, this may feel fairly ...


4

Here are some additional recipes to complement fixer1234's extensive answer: The easiest and most likely candidate for a homemade fixative is milk. Van Gogh protected a lot of his drawings using regular milk (and water)1 - at times pouring out entire glasses over them. The reason he opted for milk was because he wanted to get rid of the sheen of charcoal ...


4

For an adult with fully-developed motor skills, the holding technique that's best for you for a specific application will largely come naturally. Some muscles are stronger than others, some joints are more flexible than others, and some positions trade off fine control vs. strength and stamina. For extremely fine detail, you can manipulate the point of the ...


4

It's mostly a matter of preference, but the way you hold a pen(cil) does influence the pressure, precision, range, and rotation. Everyone develops a preferred way of holding a pen (often when learning to write), and as this grip is likely used the most, it usually is the most comfortable for that person. Because of this experience (training), this grip ...


4

It looks like a style in-between line drawing illustrations and (a lighter version of) a typical comic book inking style. It is a high-contrast style. Only deep shadows are filled in, so the rest can still be coloured in (by another artist). In this case, though, it is likely used as a stand-alone style. Characteristics: Deep shadows are exaggerated, and ...


3

Welcome to the A&C, Code Complete. The thing about eyes, is that all of them are not the same shape. Sometimes the eyeball can be referred to as, 'football shaped', 'almond shaped', and many different other types. Here area few different ideas below (You can even Google "Different eye shapes": Like the image you provided above, there isn't that ...


3

It will be easier for people to offer relevant answers if we know your constraints; what you want to avoid. I would think lots of clear spray finishes could work in a pinch (hair spray, clear paint-type finishes like lacquer, etc.; and spray application would avoid smudging). If it's a question of cost, it's just another art supply to protect your effort. ...


3

"Bond" paper is usually best for markers, it has a smooth flat surface and is usually thick enough to prevent too much bleed through. If fact there are specifically made papers for magic markers called "Marker Bond", "Marker Layout" or just "Marker Paper". With markers the main issue you will face is bleed, where the ink soaks in and expands in the paper. ...


3

Vertruvian Fine Art Studio, an online drawing and painting school has a very good answer to your question, provided by instructor David Jamieson. The shininess is "burnishing" which happens when an area is worked too much or you press too hard. He says: "In my experience, there are only 3 ways to prevent your pencil drawings from becoming ...


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