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24

Unlikely. There's a reason people keep separate fabric scissors from their regular scissors--cutting through fabric requires a very sharp blade, which you're unlikely to find on the average pizza cutter (designed to cut through soft cooked materials). What you're seeing is a rotary cutter, a circular blade on a handle that's sharp enough to cut through ...


11

Yes, if it is sufficiently sharpened. But... no restaurant would ever do that. I've worked in multiple restaurants including Pizza Hut (wow, that was 30 years ago). Most places used a rotary pizza cutter, except Pizza Hut had long curved blade at the cut station for normal pizzas. We called it the bat'leth*. Every utensil was made of high quality stainless ...


8

Just for fun, I tried it, with a well-used pizza cutter and scrap materials on a cutting mat. Though the pizza cutter is old, it still does its intended job of cutting pizza very well. It wouldn't go through thin cotton (probably an old pillowcase, that I use for checking the sewing machine is running properly). It wouldn't go through light ripstop ...


4

It's mostly a question of personal preferences and boils down to a mix of what shapes you need to cut and your bodily capabilities. Shapes If you need to cut many straight lines, gentle curves or use a hard template to cut out many pieces, most people prefer a rotary cutter for its speed and capability to cut around the edges of a template without having to ...


4

It depends on the quality of the knife. As mentioned in a comment, a pizza knife is a circular knife (also called a 'roller blade'). Like any knife it can be high or low quality, sharp or relatively blunt, strong or weak, which will be decisive for the fabrics you are able to cut with it. If you have a specific kind of fabric in mind, my suggestion would be ...


3

I'm not familiar with what are considered "standard" metric size increments, but 44 mm is within typical precision of a 1-3/4" hole, which is a common US size and probably close enough for this purpose. You can get hole punches of this general style: Source There are also gasket punches like this: Image courtesy McMaster-Carr That picture ...


3

If you can provide links and/or images, my answer can be adjusted, but at first thought, consider the following. For compass style cutters: The pivot of the cutter could be attached to a metal disk or to a magnet. The size and shape of the disk or magnet would be dependent on the structure of the pivot. If the pivot is a magnet, the underlying surface should ...


2

Think backwards. (Or as my professor put it, "Back thinkwards.") It's very uncommon for anyone to "draw first on a computer program and reverse it;" that's an unnecessary extra step and one that, perhaps obviously, did not exist at the birth of printmaking, which has existed far longer than digital technology. While I typically wouldn't ...


1

As many have described in the comments, there are a variety of computer-guided cutting machines, ranging from the cricket and silhouette level machines which are designed for home use, to more serious home-manufacturing devices like the silver bullet. These devices differ from each other in terms of price, the size of media they can work with and the variety ...


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