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24

Unlikely. There's a reason people keep separate fabric scissors from their regular scissors--cutting through fabric requires a very sharp blade, which you're unlikely to find on the average pizza cutter (designed to cut through soft cooked materials). What you're seeing is a rotary cutter, a circular blade on a handle that's sharp enough to cut through ...


11

Yes, if it is sufficiently sharpened. But... no restaurant would ever do that. I've worked in multiple restaurants including Pizza Hut (wow, that was 30 years ago). Most places used a rotary pizza cutter, except Pizza Hut had long curved blade at the cut station for normal pizzas. We called it the bat'leth*. Every utensil was made of high quality stainless ...


8

A hole saw should work fine if you can find a fine tooth model. They are not as easy to find as the common coarse teeth models meant for wood. One with a thin kerf would be best. I have also used the sharpened steel tubing trick mentioned by @fred_dot_u. An alternative to punching is pressing the sharpened tube against the board and spinning it. The spinning ...


8

Just for fun, I tried it, with a well-used pizza cutter and scrap materials on a cutting mat. Though the pizza cutter is old, it still does its intended job of cutting pizza very well. It wouldn't go through thin cotton (probably an old pillowcase, that I use for checking the sewing machine is running properly). It wouldn't go through light ripstop ...


7

The "aircraft" you reference is made of expanded polystyrene foam, also known as Styrofoam™. It is sensitive to heat to the point that there are high-temperature-based tools to address your goal. Rather than spend a bunch on specialized tools, you can use a soldering iron set just low enough to control the level of melt generated. If you have a ...


7

You may be able to create your own punch by finding a piece of steel tubing of the correct inside diameter for your holes. Using a file or grinding wheel, work away at the outside edge of the tubing to create a sharp edge. Further refine the edge with sandpaper of gradually increasing grits. You can stop periodically and test your work by placing a piece of ...


5

Have you tried using the circle cutter from the front and back? On mine the centre pin is long enough to mark the back of the foam board I've used, but you may need to push a stiff pin through in your case. You do need to be very careful to hold it exactly vertical if you're doing this, or the holes won't align, but that's always true in thick material.


4

It's mostly a question of personal preferences and boils down to a mix of what shapes you need to cut and your bodily capabilities. Shapes If you need to cut many straight lines, gentle curves or use a hard template to cut out many pieces, most people prefer a rotary cutter for its speed and capability to cut around the edges of a template without having to ...


4

It depends on the quality of the knife. As mentioned in a comment, a pizza knife is a circular knife (also called a 'roller blade'). Like any knife it can be high or low quality, sharp or relatively blunt, strong or weak, which will be decisive for the fabrics you are able to cut with it. If you have a specific kind of fabric in mind, my suggestion would be ...


3

Several years ago I had my own "mount these coins" project. My solution was to use a forstner drill bit mounted in a drill press. In my case I was mounting dimes in matte board and they squeezed into the holes very nicely. It sounds like you are mounting US fifty cent pieces which are slightly larger than the 30mm that you mentioned, but should ...


3

A "circle clicker die" in a "clicker press" will do the job cleanly and efficiently at just a few seconds per hole. Circle clicker dies are available online in many sizes, and a clicker press can be found in any shop that makes leather goods. The shop might even have the exact size clicker die that you need. If you lay out the matte board ...


3

You're gonna need a bigger boat! .. I mean knife .. The simplest would be to have a blade manufactured (or 3d printed if that gets sharp enough edges?) that meets your criteria, e.g length. if you order a bigger batch, they might get cheaper. Also you could try finding a blade from another manufacturer and then build an adapter to fit it to yours. If you ...


3

I'm not familiar with what are considered "standard" metric size increments, but 44 mm is within typical precision of a 1-3/4" hole, which is a common US size and probably close enough for this purpose. You can get hole punches of this general style: Source There are also gasket punches like this: Image courtesy McMaster-Carr That picture ...


3

If you can provide links and/or images, my answer can be adjusted, but at first thought, consider the following. For compass style cutters: The pivot of the cutter could be attached to a metal disk or to a magnet. The size and shape of the disk or magnet would be dependent on the structure of the pivot. If the pivot is a magnet, the underlying surface should ...


1

As many have described in the comments, there are a variety of computer-guided cutting machines, ranging from the cricket and silhouette level machines which are designed for home use, to more serious home-manufacturing devices like the silver bullet. These devices differ from each other in terms of price, the size of media they can work with and the variety ...


1

I have found a good way to cut them using a serrated knife and a clipboard with a bunch of printing paper held onto it. Those clipboards with wire clips work better. I slip the stick inside the wire and it holds it firmly. I place so that the end I want to cut sticks out of the top of the clipboard, so I can access it. Now I use the serrated knife to saw the ...


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