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24

Unlikely. There's a reason people keep separate fabric scissors from their regular scissors--cutting through fabric requires a very sharp blade, which you're unlikely to find on the average pizza cutter (designed to cut through soft cooked materials). What you're seeing is a rotary cutter, a circular blade on a handle that's sharp enough to cut through ...


15

Using scissors, as you have pictured, would be a contributing factor here. Using a craft knife or something similar would most certainly be the go-to tool. It is important to try to do the cutting in one motion - to not lift the blade from the paper and, if possible, not change the pressure you are exerting on the scissors. So if you were cutting this on a ...


15

Craft sticks and Popsicle sticks are not known for their quality when it comes to grain and warping. So when you are cutting them, the stress is released in the easiest way possible which is along the grain. This is especially true because of how thin they are. One of the following methods should work. They are both related in that I am suggesting multiple ...


11

I have always found one of the appeals of mosaic to be creating non-uniform / random shapes for your art. Both of these options can help capture that. Score the card If you score one surface of the card, with something like a craft knife, you should be able to make it snap along the score line. In general straighter will be easier to snap off. By all means,...


11

Yes, if it is sufficiently sharpened. But... no restaurant would ever do that. I've worked in multiple restaurants including Pizza Hut (wow, that was 30 years ago). Most places used a rotary pizza cutter, except Pizza Hut had long curved blade at the cut station for normal pizzas. We called it the bat'leth*. Every utensil was made of high quality stainless ...


10

You can try to use a compass cutter like this: I find this product rather effective on materials like leather or felt. The only problem could be if your felt is too thin, in this case it could be too flexible and it could move around while you move the compass, but I have only had this problem when I tried to cut household linen.


8

You have the right idea. Sewing near the edge but leaving the actual edge raw will achieve a frayed edge. Things to keep in mind: This will only work on a woven fabric, not a knit. Most importantly, not all edges will fray equally on a circle shape. Because of the nature of a woven fabric, the threads are horizontal and vertical. Certain places around the ...


8

A hole saw should work fine if you can find a fine tooth model. They are not as easy to find as the common coarse teeth models meant for wood. One with a thin kerf would be best. I have also used the sharpened steel tubing trick mentioned by @fred_dot_u. An alternative to punching is pressing the sharpened tube against the board and spinning it. The spinning ...


8

Just for fun, I tried it, with a well-used pizza cutter and scrap materials on a cutting mat. Though the pizza cutter is old, it still does its intended job of cutting pizza very well. It wouldn't go through thin cotton (probably an old pillowcase, that I use for checking the sewing machine is running properly). It wouldn't go through light ripstop ...


7

I would hesitate to cut my fabric into smaller pieces for storage, just because I can pretty much guarantee that as soon as you cut your fabric, the universe will send you the perfect pattern for that particular piece of fabric--but the pattern will require about 1/2 yard longer than your chosen cutting length. But the reason I wanted to post an answer is ...


7

You may be able to create your own punch by finding a piece of steel tubing of the correct inside diameter for your holes. Using a file or grinding wheel, work away at the outside edge of the tubing to create a sharp edge. Further refine the edge with sandpaper of gradually increasing grits. You can stop periodically and test your work by placing a piece of ...


7

The "aircraft" you reference is made of expanded polystyrene foam, also known as Styrofoam™. It is sensitive to heat to the point that there are high-temperature-based tools to address your goal. Rather than spend a bunch on specialized tools, you can use a soldering iron set just low enough to control the level of melt generated. If you have a ...


6

I know these as Tin Snips, or Tinner(')s Snips, and are identifiable as such because of the symmetry of the handles and blades, the wide aperture between the blades, and that the handles are longer than the blades. The difference between snips & shears? Snips are shears that are used for cutting metal. So a snip is a type of shear. And a shear? ...


6

It's worth noting, if you feel like taking a trip to your local hardware store, that they make specialty blades that fit boxcutters. Some of these are designed for laminate. Most likely, the blades that came in your boxcutter are ok for opening boxes, plastic packagine etc. However, you can buy some designed for cutting laminate, PVC, etc. Look for blades ...


6

To get a square from any shape of paper, makes sure you have a protective cutting surface, a straight edge, and a way of making straight cuts on paper all of which are large enough to accommodate the size of the piece of paper. Make a straight fold halfway across the paper (corner to corner, if there are discernible corners, will reduce wastage). Fold the ...


6

This works better if at least two of the sides are parallel. It is required that one corner is at a right angle. When I am trying to get perfect squares in paper I fold the paper in half diagonally. Not across the center exactly but more so that the two sides that make up one corner are brought together. Any paper that sticks out after that is removed. In ...


6

It sounds like you are talking about steel rule dies. These use a flexible or semi-flexible strip of steel sharpened along one edge. This is embedded in a backing (sometimess fibre/particle board) usually sitting in a thin profile-cut slot which supports the steel cutting edge. You can buy the prepared steel stock and make the dies yourself and there are ...


6

Your question is limited by not having an indication of the resources available to you. One of the better tools would be a scroll saw, often called a jig saw. The tabletop versions are well suited to light duty cuts such as popsicle sticks. Another suitable tool, somewhat unwieldy, is the rotary hobby tool, often called a dremel tool, from the brand name ...


6

Focus on keeping the paper against the point where the two scissor blades cross. At this one point, the paper is being sliced simultaneously by both blades which decreases the thickness which each blade needs to cut through. When the paper slides forward onto only one blade, the speed of cutting slows because one of the two blades has been removed from the ...


6

I think you might be close to a solution by using heat, but consider to combine a source of heat with a cutter blade. This will allow you to use the tip of the blade to have a minimal impact on the surface, while providing the means to puncture the surface. You may find that you can re-heat the blade for each cut and use this method for the entire opening. ...


5

There are lapidary materials that can be cut without using specialized saws. Small raw gemstones are not good candidates, however. Prior to modern lapidary equipment, cutting small gemstones relied on understanding, and taking advantage of, a stones natural cleavage. This method gives very little flexibility as to how and where you cut, and will result in ...


5

Having used frequently both a Silhouette Cameo 3 and a reasonably powerful laser cutter, I can perhaps offer up both sides. Cameo 3 Plus: Quieter in operation, by a huge factor Much less expensive Easier to set up/calibrate initially Can use common software such as Inkscape, Adobe Illustrator, Corel Draw to create designs Hobby grade cutters are usually ...


5

Cutting out the truck and trees would be pretty straight forward. Just find equivalent vector art in whatever format your laser likes. Online trace and format transformation websites are available to help with that step. To make the truck and trees stand up, you will need to add a square tab to the bottom of each tire and to the base of the tree's trunk. ...


5

Have you tried using the circle cutter from the front and back? On mine the centre pin is long enough to mark the back of the foam board I've used, but you may need to push a stiff pin through in your case. You do need to be very careful to hold it exactly vertical if you're doing this, or the holes won't align, but that's always true in thick material.


4

They actually make tools for this. They're called circle cutters. Some of them have the option to do a beveled opening. They're designed to make full circles or ovals but I'm sure you could use them for partial ones, too. As an example this one has excellent reviews on Amazon and is made by the same company as your straight mat cutter but it looks like it ...


4

A jewelers saw (also known as a piecing saw) should do the job these have very thin, fine toothed blades, almost a like a flattened wire which can handle very intricate cutting jobs. Image from micromark.com You may also want some needle files to tidy up the cut edges afterwards. You will need to drill a small hole where you want to start the cut. Then ...


4

The best way I've found is to do it with wire cutters (as described here). You pinch/crush the wood at the correct place to weaken the stick (no need to try and cut all the way through), and then bend the cutters back and forth to snap the wood fibres until you've cut right the way through. It can still be a little fiddly and you will have some losses ...


4

In case anyone has a similar need in the future, I'll add a tool. The question doesn't indicate the circle size, but if you're using a plastic stencil, I'll assume the circles aren't very big. You can get inexpensive sets of hollow punches sold as gasket punches. They're typically a collection resembling this: Image courtesy Amazon I bought a cheap ...


4

Don't cut your fabric until you know what you're making out of it. While it is possible to "piece" fabric when your pattern pieces are larger than your fabric, it's a pain in the neck, and the results are never as nice as an un-pieced garment. I know it can be nice to store your fabric pre-washed, so you can just grab what you need and start sewing, but it'...


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