9

All of the cross stich projects I've done did not fill in the background with a solid color. This is typical in embroidery -- the design itself is stitched in, and the base fabric is used as the background. Not only is this faster and simpler for the crafter, it helps the design stand out from the background both texturally and visually. Sampler by ...


8

You could try fray check. These glues tend to be thinner, which would give you a less noticeable and stiff edge. They are usually clear, but may yellow over time. If that isn't strong enough, you could try fabric glue, which as the name suggests, is specifically made for bonding fabrics. You can also finish the back of your piece without glue! After ...


4

Ugh, confetti stitches are the worst! Especially when it's not a full coverage piece like you're describing. But you have options :) The easiest starting option with an even number of threads is a "simple loop start". So instead of using two threads of colour, use one and fold it in half to make a loop at the end that you go through (on the back of ...


4

For my cross stitch work, I machine stitch the edges all around with a zigzag (preferably a three-step). If by hand, I use a scaled down version of a blanket stitch. For something that will be washed, I would make the stitches closer though not as close as a buttonhole stitch. As for worries about stitches coming loose, I have none. I learned as a youngster ...


4

From my knitting experience, the empirical way to find out would be a swatch - make N stitches, then rip it out. Measure how much thread you used and divide by N to get a rough estimate of thread per stitch. If you want to calculate it from first principles, you also need to take into account the fabric count. For example, 14-count Aida has 14 holes per ...


4

I don't recommend leaving your cross stitched projects sandwiched between glass. This compresses/flattens the stitches which can make them look odd. Taking the piece to a reputable framing shop is probably the best idea unless you make a lot of projects and want to learn how to do it yourself or if the project is relatively small. A good shop should know ...


3

If you are willing to experiment on my behalf my suggestion would be to use 2 part epoxy resin. It is self leveling, and dries hard, clear, and smooth (if done well). Most people use resin for larger projects so instead of buying large containers of the stuff for small projects like this you might be able to get away with the smaller ones that you would ...


3

I'm not a cross-stitcher, my sister is, but the thing that would make me hesitate to not fill in the white is really tied to appearance in two ways: The thread rises above the surface of the canvas and so not filling in where it is white will tend to create a "bald" appearance as a result of light, with apparent shadows. I've noticed this with partial works ...


2

For the pattern you posted, I would look at which stitches are rather close together, and 'hop' from island to island, taking a route so that the thread at the back doesn't form loops that are too large. When there are single stitches or small groups that are further apart, I reason as follows: are the stitches/groups so far apart that it takes less thread ...


2

It depends on the quality of the white in the picture and the white of the canvas. If the white in the picture is meant to be true white, like snow or the glint in an eye, it is worth to stitch it with pure white thread. But if it is just 'not part of the picture' as you often have in cross stitch (and other embroidery) work you can easily leave it open. I ...


2

Allowing the underlying material to remain exposed is largely a matter of preference. Generally, a low count Aida, will look unfinished if not completely cross-stitched, whereas, a high count Aida, decorative canvases, and linens will tend to look more "finished" without a cross-stitched background.


2

You could also try using fusible hemming tape or fusible interfacing. You could then prepare the edges either by laying the hemming tape about 1/2" from the edges of your cross stitch fabric, and then folding the edge down and adhering the whole thing with your iron (follow the instructions for hemming tape, and you will see what I mean. Or you could use a ...


1

An alternative to making swatches but still getting measurements from embroidery you have done, work with pre-cut lengths and count what you have done with a given number of lengths. This will work best if you work a fair block or a lot of smaller blocks, so you can use several lengths and have something to count. This will obviously work when you can ...


1

When starting out I would try to get some of the bigger areas, so you have a bit of a body to anchor the rest of the work in. Like the red diagonal markers which are at the top third of your picture. Once you have a big island you can start working on the smaller islands and only then fill in the single stitches in the area. When you would that method you ...


1

If you take it to a frame shop, they'll basically do what Catija has posted. However, there are two things I would like to add. The first being that it's not a good idea to just tack it to the board, those could become loose, another option is 'sewing' the piece. You don't actually sew it to the board, but rather pin it around the board and then sew the ...


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