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Different metals have different issues. For example, aluminum is highly reactive with the alkaline concrete (the reaction is used to create foamed concrete). Iron rusts and decomposes all the way through. Besides losing its integrity, the rust can crack the concrete. Brass is much less affected by the concrete. The concrete can accelerate development of ...


5

The short answer is no. Countertops near a sink often have water puddles sitting on them for awhile, and a sink is submerged in water. You really need a surface that is at least waterproof, not just water resistant. Even better than waterproof is something rated as submersible. Water resistant PVA won't be suitable long term, and would make it nearly ...


5

Mainly a terminology thing, but "concrete" wouldn't be used for jewelry. That term refers to a mix that includes large aggregate that's held together with a cement binder. On something like a road or sidewalk, the layer of rocks provides the strength and the cement just holds it in place. On relatively thick art castings, you might be able to ...


5

Both ShapeCrete and SculptCrete (and similar products), are cement-based mixtures that are designed to be used in several ways, including molding it like clay. To achieve the clay-like handling and ability to hold fine detail, everything in the mixture has a very small particle size, and they may contain some additives (like clays). If you mix them with ...


4

Surface texture The fineness of the sand determines the surface texture (ignoring texture created by the surface of the mold or through a treatment like brushing the surface). On something like a sidewalk, where high traction is important, relatively coarse sand may be used or combined with finer sand, resulting in a gritty surface. Finer sand is used for ...


3

This question is premised on a particular cement product that could be handled like clay but appeared to dry looking like poured concrete. It turns out that is not the case. So the "simplest" answer is that the question is based on bad assumptions. However, depending on actual requirements, the objective of the question could have full or ...


1

Epoxy The question mentions resin and then asks about epoxy. There are certain resins that can be used as a bonding agent, but epoxy isn't one of them. It is sometimes used to anchor something like rebar in holes in the old concrete to add mechanical strength between the old and new layers. You can also use epoxy to glue together two pieces of cured ...


1

Concrete/cement has limited adhesive strength. Surface roughness, undercuts, and rebar/mesh is used to hold concrete structures together. As implied in your question; The epoxy/resin provides most of the adhesive strength when bonding concrete. If epoxy is cured, concrete will provide very little adhesion to it.


1

Interior-grade paint can sometimes be affected if it gets wet (depending on the composition), and may fade or degrade from exposure to UV (I'm not familiar with how the specific paint you used will hold up to exterior exposure and weather). Normally, I wouldn't worry about peeling, given the prep you describe. But concrete can absorb moisture, which can ...


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