7

It depends on what you want to draw, and in what style. Working with charcoal on canvas will really emphasize the texture of the canvas, creating a rough impression. It will be hard to draw details - in relation to the size, that is: you can still draw details but they'll have to be larger or implied rather than drawn carefully. Coincidentally I've recently ...


6

No, you don't really need that white charcoal :) However, it can be a very useful and fun to work with. White charcoal can be used to create highlights in drawings, and is particularly effective in combination with dark charcoal. It is often used in academic drawing when drawing from a real-life references, like nudes: Pierre-Paul Prud'hon - Standing female ...


6

Paper will yellow over time because of lignin in the pulped wood. Choosing an archival, acid-free fixative means that the fixative itself should not yellow over time. Unfortunately, the primary purpose of the fixative is to prevent smudging of the media that is on your paper. While it can slow down paper yellowing over time (by reducing the surface area of ...


5

Charcoal is organic matter (usually wood) that has been partially burned in a low-oxygen environment. To make it, you take wood, exclude air, and apply heat. How to make charcoal with a fire and a metal container packed full of wood pieces Supply list: small pieces of wood (eg willow or charcoal) a metal container with a lid and vent hole(s) an outdoor fire ...


5

You won't notice a lot of differences between using vine and willow charcoal. Vine (of the grape) tends to be slightly darker in tone, is physically a little harder than willow, and I believe it has a somewhat finer structure. Vine is thinner and usually a little straighter than willow. The latter can come in a larger variety of thicknesses, which can be ...


5

Kneaded erasers are usually perfect for erasing charcoal. However, when it comes to erasing charcoal, the success of kneaded erasers depends on a few factors: The type of paper I've experienced problems erasing charcoal from papers with very low to no grain (this includes the typical A4 printer paper, on which it is hard to draw with anything to begin with)....


5

I have done a lot of charcoal drawings, and I mostly used paper by Canson (XL, Academy) and Fabriano (large sheets or rolls of the Accademia variety). They create several ranges of papers, and both include very affordable ones. I have not had problems with yellowing of paper, despite some of these works being almost twenty years old, but admittedly most are ...


4

You will probably need medium and soft charcoal for creating smoothly blended surfaces (like her skin), and some hard charcoals or perhaps even a carbon pencil (which contains a mixture of charcoal and graphite) for the crisp textures of her armor and the fine lines of her hair. For blending, you may want to use a tortillion or a blending stump and a kneaded ...


4

Joachim's answer provides very good info focused on the archival aspect to what makes a "good paper" in your question. But he just touches upon the two most critical aspects of what makes a good paper as far as drawing on it is concerned: the weight and the tooth of the paper. Weight being a combination of thickness and durability, tooth being the ...


3

Using a fixative, as described in previous answers here, is a standard way of protecting one's own work. On an acquired piece, you're free to do whatever you want with your own property. However, it would likely negatively affect the market value or historical value of the piece. On a valuable or historical work, fixative might be viewed similar to "...


2

I'm not a charcoal artist, so this is more in the nature of observation and very general theory. This question and your other one about drawing the scratches in the armor are about getting very fine and subtle texture, detail, and gradients using charcoal. Charcoal is a relatively "crude" medium; this kind of life-like detail takes skill. People ...


2

I'll assume you're talking about Conté pencils (Fusain Charcoal, that often come in sets with grey and white Conté). Caran d'Ache has a pencil extender with a 9 mm diameter, which should be sufficient for those pencils, which are slightly smaller. You can search for 'FixPencil 0012' or 'CARAN 12.009' (e.g. here). And there are generic brand double-ended ...


1

I've created numerous paintings with rough sketch on the first layer of canvas. I would imagine it would depend on the roughness of the canvas. I have not personally tried to do a final piece on a piece of canvas with just pencil or charcoal. Only light outlines. Prime canvas would be even more difficult to achieve because it gives a waxy layer on top of the ...


1

Depending on the paper and pressure you apply to your pencil, when you use graphite over charcoal, you will just scratch away most of the charcoal powder. Fixating the charcoal first won't help much, since the charcoal particles are much larger, and this process will just mess up the drawing more. On the other hand, using charcoal over graphite won't work ...


1

Damage to the leather is just like any other detail. It is created by relief (changes in height) in the surface, so it is rendered the same. Just like the embossed areas of the leather, one side of the impression will capture light and the other will cast shadow. So to draw scratches etc., you would use light edges and dark edges along the contour of the ...


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