9

From the image you've shown it looks like you're on the first row of knitting after casting on, and it also looks like you've used a loop (a.k.a. backwards loop) cast-on method. It's common to get an ever-increasing amount of slack on the first row when using this kind of cast-on. A loop cast-on is easy to do, but hard to do well because the tension used ...


8

Getting a circular cast-on up and running can indeed be tricky. Fortunately, there are several techniques that can help. Use a sturdy cast-on The long-tail cast-on is a good one for this as it basically includes the first row of knitting. Be careful if you need stretch, though. Add some weight to the cast-on This can be done by putting some stitch markers ...


5

The slack in the work between the needles will even out with the next stitch. The slack in the yarn you are using to make the new stitches should be pulled tight when you make your stitch. While your attention is on it you will find that your new stitches might look different from the one you made before. It is mostly better to knit a small piece that is ...


4

The long-tail cast-on is a sturdy one, excellent for when you need structure, but not so much when you need stretchy. Better choices, in turns of stretch, include: cabled cast-on (super easy) tubular cast-on (to go with 1-1 ribbing) rolled edge (easy, durable, and would let you still use the long-tail method) The links are for TECHknitting, but these are ...


4

What Willeke says is good advice. Also: make sure you use the right size needle. Your yarn will indicate what needle size you should use. This can either be in mm, UK sizes or US sizes. My current yarn says 7-8mm needles for example. Different people have different knitting styles. I personally like knitting tight. I will prefer the larger size in the ...


1

The looseness or tightness has some effect from how close one cast-on loop is to its neighbor. I tend to cast on too tightly and have sometimes held a circular needle together with a narrower double-point. If experimenting with where you place each loop doesn't change things, you might cast on to a smaller needle than you use for the rest of the piece.


1

If right-handed knitting, lay your right pointer finger tip on the needle while casting on each stitch to make sure there's a space between the stitches. Then spin the needle clockwise all the way around before casting on each stitch. I got this from the "Learn the Elastic Cast-On with Knitting Expert Patty Lyons!" video on the https://www.youtube.com/watch?...


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