8

Small brass eyelets could be quite durable in this application. These are sold for card-making and scrapbooking and used to appear on certain kinds of office supplies in very similar applications. They might also be sold at leather crafting outlets. They would require a hole be punched in the cardboard first, for best wear characteristics. Also, how far ...


7

Brass fasteners can be used to connect two pieces of cardboard so that they rotate about the connected point. While the two prongs are sticking straight out, they are pushed through both pieces of cardboard, and then the prongs are flattened out to either side to secure them.


6

Cutting mats are avilable in a wide range of sizes. I have A4 and A5, but even A1 (59.4 x 84.1 cm or 23.3 x 33.1 inches) aren't expensive at around £/$/€20. They provide a reasonably non-slip surface (Link is to a UK shop, just happens to have a range on one page). If you want even bigger, a layer or two of vinyl flooring can work in the short term, but ...


6

You can paint (spray paint if you want to be quick) all cards before gluing the paper. Black spray paint will make everything even and often only needs one coat, white spray paint often needs 2-3 coats.


5

Glue stick doesn’t curl paper. You have to be careful what brand you chose, though (some just don’t stick well). Of the ones I know UHU stic would be a good choice – it’s quite strong.


5

If you do not require the thickness apparent in the provided image, you may be satisfied with laser foil, also called heat transfer foil. The laser aspect is somewhat misleading, as it uses a laser printer (or toner-based copier) to bond the foil to the paper. The base concept in the above described process is that toner is printed in the normal manner on ...


5

If you want the poster to be solid glitter, not simply speckled, I would use a spray adhesive, which is best with large surfaces. It also will not add additional weight or bow the the poster like a liquid or paste glue. Spray adhesive and glitter are extremely messy. Work outside with plenty of ground cover (I suggest paper) and a large over-spray zone (...


5

I just did this - I wanted to make thick business cards myself, but my printer won't print on any paper thicker than regular copy paper. So I printed my card template out on regular paper and then used iron-on sewing interfacing (Wonder Under) to glue it to thick watercolor paper. No bubbles, looks great - made some cards with one layer of 110 pound paper ...


5

Regardless of what you intend to decorate the inside of your tubes with, I think the solution is to apply the adhesive on the inside first and then decorate. I was looking at a way to get paint brush bristles angled at 90 degrees either via a kludge, like an elastic, or a commercial product but I had issues searching for "90 degree brush head". What little ...


5

Waterproof paint for the flat parts, tape for the edges. Any kind of spreadable waterproof fluid will do for the large faces of the cardboard sheets. Paint or glue could both work, but paint is probably more cost-effective. There are many types of waterproof paint (acrylic, enamel, anything listed as exterior-grade). The edges will be harder to deal with ...


5

My preferred tool for heavy card is the classic Stanley 99 knife. The blade is slightly stiffer than those of the snap-off craft knives, and the metal handle is good and solid. If you do go for a snap-off knife, for heavy card stick to one that takes 18 mm or even the rare 25 mm blades, rather than 9 mm blades, which are too flexible (but ...


4

After about a week of scouring the web I found a forum that mentions using an HP Photosmart Pro B9180. This is a semi-pro printer. It has an option for a straight paper path and can print on items up to 1.5mm thick which is enough for my 42pt paperboard media stock. It is no longer made so you have to go to the used market. Refurbished units seem to be ...


4

For your objective, spill-resistant and ding resistant, you're dealing with two parameters that could be combined. As noted in Bill Horvath's answer, the weight will be a factor. Cardboard for concrete forms is pretty durable and somewhat moisture resistant "out of the box", and could take mild abuse without modification. Virtually any paint will ...


3

The answer for using brass fasteners is quite elegant and there are larger diameter plastic fasteners that work in a similar manner, but if you want "cheap and easy," consider the following: Cut two circles of your cardboard to be of say, the diameter of a coin (US $0.25 piece, for example). These are the outer caps. Cut two or three more pieces of a ...


3

You've not provided much in the way of your available equipment and skills, and the task you've set for yourself has substantial supporting requirements. A book press is top of the list. You can build your own, with appropriate research, tools and materials, or you can purchase one to fit your needs. A book press is used to compress paper pages, but can ...


3

How about a very thin acrylic sheet/plexiglass. It may not be as rigid as you need (being too thin), you have to check that for yourself. Also, plexiglass is not a very cheap material, generally speaking, but the price depends on the size and the thickness of the sheet, so what you are looking for may not end up being expensive. If that doesn't work for you, ...


3

Since Chris has properly covered our misplaced-answers from the comments, I will offer some high end solutions... Laser cutters, industrial strength vinyl cutters and picture-framing mat-cutters are all good options for working with heavy cardboard. Scroll saws and Band saws can also work. See if you have a makerspace or fablab in your area where tools ...


3

You don't specify what kind of processing is permitted on the cardboard, if any, but if you have relatively free rein I'd recommend investigating papier mache - it has been used historically for furniture making so could represent a very viable option for making chairs out of cardboard. Options range from a very basic and functional version made from ...


3

I bought a brush years ago that has a bend in the handle (about 45 degrees) that might work for toilet paper tubes (not long enough for paper towel tubes), but it'd be very, very difficult to use with any precision. I'd recommend one of two things: Use construction paper or other relatively stiff paper, and curl it up to place inside. You don't need to ...


3

One thing that might work to reduce but not prevent sticking is sticker backing paper (waxed/plasticised). Unfortunately it's rather obvious, and not easy to attach because it's designed not to stick to glue. Another hard to attach (I suggest staples) material is reusable non-stick cooking liner. It's normally brown similar to much packaging cardboard, but ...


3

If you have a makerspace in your area or a similar craft related activity/club, you may be able to gain use of a craft cutter such as the Silhouette Cameo or a Cricut product. Still associated with the makerspace, you may find members with a laser cutter. Stretching the application a bit means you could also use a flatbed CNC machine to make the straight and ...


3

Depending on the accuracy you require for your shape, you can certainly use cardboard to create the reflector. If you don't require it to be a reflector, it gets easier! Consider that the shape is a three dimensional revolution of a two dimensional curve. One will have to presume that you can create the curve on cardboard using the formula of your choice. ...


2

Use a hot glue gun with clear glue to seal the side holes all the way around and then paint with a clear sealant.


2

I've successfully painted the inside of tubes by pulling sponges through them on strings. Saturating the sponge with slightly thinned paint worked best for me, but I needed a matte black finish and it took several coats drying in between. It strikes me that a slightly oversized round piece of sponge with poster paint of different colours applied to it ...


2

Expensive but - how about spraymount? Might be worth using for such an expensive/important multi item project - where weighting every sheet as it dries is going to take you forevvver. I would try it on a few first, and try stacking 5 or ten cards with a larger flat sheet of card and a weight on top like a heavy flat book, as they dry.


2

Try either an acrylic medium or PVA glue (like the kind for woodworking). After applying it to one or both sides and spreading it out VERY evenly, place the glued pieces between two layers of waxed paper and then press with a heavy weight or clamp between two boards for 24 hours. Don’t dilute it with water, because that’s a great way to introduce wrinkles.


2

YES paste is a glue often used in book-making, because it is more reliable and provides a higher-quality result. You can also dilute the glue to match the heaviness of the paper, which can greatly reduce curling as well. Edit: Another solution is to leave your cards under a flat weight (like a big book) for the first 30 minutes of dry time. This will help ...


2

Look into the several cardboard stools which are commercially available. And read the limitations on those as far as weight is concerned. A google images search 'cardboard stool' will reveal many stools and several chairs. This link leads to a stool on a commercial site, very basic two sheets of cardboard crossing and a third sheet on top as seat, they ...


2

If you’re not willing to spend tons of money and pour two component epoxy onto a Fiberglas mat to create a backing plate (the thinnest most sturdy construction approach I can think of) then the second best thing to do would probably be to use spray adhesive on 1/16” galvanized sheet metal. Cutting them to the right size is really hard without the right tools,...


2

Xacto knife is the artist standard for cutting mats when mounting pictures. Mats are made from a very thick cardstock. You already have the stencil, you may want to get a French Curve ruler. That helps with stability while cutting. LINKS See the xacto website for knives & blade options. There’s a wiki link about french curves. Also an article about ...


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