6

Many years ago, I made some small model people and animals out of fabric, wool, old toilet roll tubes, etc. Their heads were usually made out of pom-poms perhaps 5-10 cm in diameter, as you can see in this model of a witch:

pom-poms pom-poms

I had a nice simple way of making these pom-poms, which I found in a book (a Ladybird children's book - ah, nostalgia), but now I can't remember how it went.

How can I make a pom-pom of this kind?

4

A variation on Erica's answer there are a couple of things you can do differently if making smaller pom poms.

  1. Wrap the yarn around a common fork. Using more yarn (more loops) will give you a more uniform/spherical appearance. If possible leave a small space between the tines of the fork and body of the fork. This makes the next step easier.
  2. Use a single strand of yarn and tie it around the loops. You can place it in-between the fork tines in order to get around the yarn loops. Make it tight. (You could also just use a pipe cleaner depending on how you plan to use them)
  3. Cut all the loops out just the same.
  4. You can fluff up the end of the pompom by using something like a wire brush. Using the brush all around the surface will fray the ends creating a more solid appearance.

    enter image description here

    Wool yarn brushed. Image from clonesnclowns.com

  5. Using small scissors, like sewing scissors, to clean up if some of the frays got out of control.

Here is a video showing the use of the above process minus the brush


Cardboard Disc Method

To make larger poms or to try and help make ones different sized ones consistently then you can try using a pair of cardboard discs

The following will consist of stills from this video that outlines this procedure nicely.

  1. Make two cardboard discs. They will be shaped like a doughnut with pie slice removed.

    The discs

  2. Place a small tail of yarn in between those discs. You will be using this to tie of later much in the same way as the other method above. This is a very important part as this will be used to hold the whole pom together. You need to always be aware of where this string is during the process and not lose in inside the yarn wraps.

    If your yarn is weak and prone to snapping under tension you should use something stronger. Wire work here as well if these will be part of a larger project.

    The center yarn

  3. Starting wrapping as much yarn as you deem necessary around the doughnut/circle. The more you use the tighter your pom will be.

    Start wrapping

  4. Get scissors and cut the yarn in between the discs. Again, be aware of the location of the yarn tail so as to not cut it or lose it. You will have to hold the center of the discs to keep them together until you tie off.

  5. Use the tail and tie around the cut yarn. You should be able to remove the disc now.

  6. Beyond that the rest is the same. Fluff up the yarn to make your ball. Trim to get a more spherical shape. Use a brush if that effect is desired.


Disc Variation

There is at least one other variation to the cardboard disc method that uses specialized templates. It claims to be 5 times faster. If you are making more than a fair share of these it would be worth considering.

disc variation template

Image from homemade-gifts-made-easy.com. Two of them, wrapped with yarn, would be used to make a pom

| improve this answer | |
  • I have seen plastic thingies that do the job of the cardboard for sale in several countries. They do work fast and the prices have come down enough for most people to be able to afford them. – Willeke Apr 27 '17 at 20:40
3

The method I learned in grade school goes like this. I'll try to get some pictures of this later to better illustrate the technique.

  1. Find yarn in the color(s) you want in your pom-pom.
  2. Loop it around your fingers repeatedly. The more fingers you use, the "fatter" the final pom-pom will be.
  3. Take the loops off your fingers, and tie (a separate piece of yarn) firmly around the center of the loop group. It should now look like an 8 or ∞.
  4. Cut through the loops on each end, so you've got a bunch of yarn strands tied in the middle.
  5. Fluff.
| improve this answer | |
  • I found this video tutorial that would compliment this well youtube.com/watch?v=lSFZ42uq6x4 – Matt May 18 '16 at 12:01
  • Also found a variation using cardboard discs: youtube.com/watch?v=a03BTR3_3qg. Using hands seems easier to me as least. – Matt May 18 '16 at 12:08
  • The cardboard has the advantage of making more consistently sized loops, I'd imagine, but it also seems like a lot more work :) – Erica May 18 '16 at 12:22
  • Most the last part when you have to wrap the yarn around. You have to hold the center in place so that it does not become loose. Obviously some people like the idea though. – Matt May 18 '16 at 13:28
  • 1
    Count the number of wraps you make with the yarn so you can repeat/adjust as needed. – JPhi1618 May 18 '16 at 21:37
0

To make a pom pom from net follow the steps:

  1. Create a fan like structure from the net.
  2. Tie a string in middle of your fan.
  3. Open up from all the sides.
| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    This would be better complimented with pictures, links and or more description. As it stands I don't know exactly what a net is and what a _ fan like structure_ is. – Matt May 5 '17 at 11:34
  • Matt - Net is Tulle - commonly found in craft and sewing stores, all different colors, often used for petticoats under skirts to make them stand out, for ballet skirts, bows, crafts, etc. To fan it out just means to spread out the end not fixed by the string so it assumes a fan-like shape. Here are some Tulle craft ideas from Pinterest, one showing how to make a Pom-Pom: pinterest.com/explore/tulle – user1798 Jul 5 '17 at 1:16

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.