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I was making some clip on ties for work for me to wear on casual Fridays. I could not wear regular ties with t-shirts as that would just look odd. I picked up some second hand ties to make into clip on ties.

Fairly easy thing to do but the issue came when I had to shorten the tail of the tie. I needed to but about 5-8 inches off and sewing them back together was difficult. The fibers used in the ties are very frail especially when cut. I had to sew deeper into the tie to get it to close even a little.

The result was less than satisfactory:

Bad tie splice

Click image to enlarge

What can I do to make sewing this back together by hand a cleaner venture?

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You need to stiffen the fibres so that the thread does not tear though them while you are sewing.

Clear nail polish

I ended up buying a small container and applied in all along the edges of the tie tail. About a 1/4 inch all around.

After letting it dry it gave something for the thread to hold onto. Made it loads easier to get cleaner results.

Better done tie splice

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  • 1
    Downside appears to be that it completely changes the pattern of your tie though : – Nick Udell May 17 '16 at 15:05
  • @NickUdell Very true. That depends on the complexity of the design and the willingness to let that go for something that is not seen very often. That, in at least my case, I can accept it. I tried to line some of them up but a stitch every 10 is too tight or something and then at the end the pattern is misaligned – Matt May 17 '16 at 15:36
  • Did you remove the polish after? How? – user24 May 19 '16 at 0:26
  • @creationedge I didn't need to remove it. It's hidden inside the tail now – Matt May 19 '16 at 0:28
  • I'd know, and it'd bug me, but you seem more laid back about it! – user24 May 19 '16 at 0:42
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To prevent (actually: to minimise) fraying, you can use zig zag scissors known as pinking shears.

zig zag scissors


And you can use non-woven interfacing. Make sure you choose a type that has a pre-glued side. You can iron it to fabric. It prevents fraying and deforming.

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  • +1. Zig-zag scissors look odd, but they really work. – Rand al'Thor May 22 '16 at 13:12

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