3

I am completely new to cosplay and am needing help with some components for a build I am working on. My goal is to have a helmet system that can hear people around me, and I would like to be able to speak to others. I know at the very least I will need a power source, two sets of speakers, one for my ears, and the other for my voice to be projected, as well as a microphone. I am unsure as to what would be the best power source for this project, such as a 9v battery, or a 4 pack of double or triple A's. I also don't know the proper wire to use for this project. Right now, I just need to get everything wired up to test if it works, then I can work on a mounting system and then fit the helmet around that. What would be the best place to look for these components as well as how to properly wire everything together?

  • 1
    I'd be inclined to think of headphones rather than speakers for you to hear with. If the speakers are in the same confined space as the microphone you're liable to get feedback right off the bat. – scanny May 2 '18 at 3:15
  • Why exactly do you need all of this? It's unlikely that you'll be able to hear nothing through the helmet unless you're really trying to block out all noise, and likewise with being able to speak. – walrus May 2 '18 at 9:43
  • I am cosplaying as a Mandalorian, or rather that is my intent to cosplay as one. I know it is quite an odd thing to do for a project as simple, as using eva foam or pvc for armor and what not. – Steven Richard Ledoux May 10 '18 at 20:53
  • I do appreciate the concern about feedback, that can always be an issue, I had to do a lot of A/V for events, trying to monitor the audio levels was a big pain. – Steven Richard Ledoux May 10 '18 at 20:57
3

One option you have is to use off-the-shelf items rather than to try to build your own from components. So many different options are available for the objective you describe, but I think I've found one that fits well with your use.

It's a wired intercom kit that uses a 9V battery and a pair of wires to connect one station to the other. The $19.95 price is for one unit, you'd have to buy two for your purposes.

wired intercom kit

The microphone is the silver cylinder in the lower left corner of the circuit board and could be extended to the outside (ear?) of the helmet, while the board and speaker would be mounted inside. If you wanted to go slightly overboard, get one set for each ear and one for you, with the speaker at the outside mouth location and the board and microphone inside near your mouth.

As a kit, you'd have to be able to solder the components to the board, but that's a good start in the maker world and a skill that may serve you again in the future. The kit is a good one for learning to solder, as there are few components and nothing too small or complex.

Unfortunately, the instruction manual does not include part identification, nor sequence for assembly, and is therefore lacking as a true tutorial for soldering, but it is not advertised as such. It should still be possible for a novice if appropriate searches are made online for the polarized components.

| improve this answer | |
  • Thanks for the specifics on this. definitely very useful. If I may ask, what would you recommend as a power source for this project, 9V, AA, or AAA? – Steven Richard Ledoux May 10 '18 at 20:55
  • The information provided for the kit indicates that it uses a 9 volt battery. This would lead me to believe that the current draw is low, as that type of battery does not tolerate well high current use. – fred_dot_u May 10 '18 at 21:02

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.