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As far as I know Irezumi are Japanese tattoos. I really like them but I'm not interested in the tattoo part but in the drawings.

I would like to read and see some art book about this style of drawings but I don't know what I should search for.

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    As your question stands, it is probably too broad. What research have you already done? What particular aspect of Irezumi are you interested in? Until now, I knew nothing about it, but looking at googled images, it appears to be a fusion of traditional Japanese and Chinese art, together with more modern elements (e.g. manga). which may themselves derive partly from Irezumi. You should start by researching Chinese and Japanese art, especially textiles. Look for traditional kimono designs. This has the makings of a good question, but it needs more work.
    – Mick
    Apr 16 '17 at 22:37
  • I like Irezumi koi fish and textures, and i would like to understand if they are a modern evolution of traditional japanese drawings, because most of the traditional drawings has much lighter color. I would like to understand if the Irezumi drawings are copied from paintings. For a comparison if I see a Monnalisa tattoo I would like to get to know Leonardo da Vinci paintings.
    – al404IT
    Apr 16 '17 at 23:07
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    As currently written this is a request for resources which is off topic for this and most Stacks. From comments it seems like you might be interested in the history of this art which is also off-topic as a standalone question. We are an applied Arts and crafts site. So if you show an example and are curious as to whats techniques or styles were used in their creation that could be on topic.
    – Matt
    Apr 17 '17 at 16:28
  • While we might not have the user base for this topic we have a number of users familiar in many genres of drawing. Ask for their opinion in Arts & Crafts Chat and you might be good results as well. If you want help fleshing out this question you can bring it up in Arts & Crafts Meta
    – Matt
    Apr 17 '17 at 16:30
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Irezumi itself is not an art style but rather a technique and a craft - tattooing onto skin which is traditionally done with tools originating from woodblock printmaking.

The esthetics and imagery you refer to originates from the very famous Japanese art style Ukiyo-e which developed and rose to fame in conjunction with japanese woodblock printing in the Edo period (17th-19th century) in Japan.

Some Masters of the art of Ukiyo-e:

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